Category: <span>thoughts by Jon Walker</span>

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.Matthew 5:3 (NIV)


Jesus says, “God blesses those who are poor and realize their need for him, for the Kingdom of Heaven is theirs.” Matthew 5:3 (NLT) He means we must come to the end of ourselves. We have to leave behind any self-sufficiency or self-righteousness and come to the place where we realize our only hope is in Jesus Christ, our Lord.

We must be desperate for God: “You’re blessed when you’re at the end of your rope. With less of you there is more of God and his rule.” Matthew 5:3 (MSG)

The original disciples did not have religious wealth, in the sense that they did not have ‘churchy’ prestige or position. And, as they followed Jesus, they were inexperienced in this new way. All they could do was follow Jesus for each next step; they couldn’t rely on well-worn traditions that are so easily leaned upon in place of a relationship with Jesus.

They had nowhere else to turn but to Jesus—and it should be that way for us, as well. If you really believed there was nowhere else to turn but Jesus, how would your life change?

by Jon Walker
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We should go up and take possession of the land, for we can certainly do it.” Numbers 13:30b

When the Israelites first approached the borders of Canaan, Moses sent scouts into the Promised Land to assess the situation. Ten of the scouts came back with reports that focused on the giants in the land, men so big and powerful the scouts feared they could not be defeated.

However, two of the scouts focused on the promise from God that he would hand the land over to the Israelites. One of those scouts, Caleb, silenced the others when he said,

We should go up and take possession of the land, for we can certainly do it”  Numbers 13:30

Caleb trusted God instead of trusting his own fear. The opposite of fear is faith, the belief that Jesus is capable of handling anything we may face in life. But operating out of faith means we must rely on Jesus, remaining dependent on him to see us through any issue.

He brings us to a choice: Will we trust God or will we trust our own fears?

The Bible says, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom” (Proverbs 9:10a). In other words, we hold God in reverence, recognizing his sovereignty, authority, and omnipotence—his ability to protect us in any situation.

And we reach that level of trust by knowing the Father and understanding his character: “[K]nowledge of the Holy One is understanding” (Proverbs 9:10b). We know and understand the Father by following Jesus.

To see me is to see the Father,” says Jesus. “Don’t you believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words that I speak to you aren’t mere words. I don’t just make them up on my own. The Father who resides in me crafts each word into a divine act” (John 14:9b–10 Msg).

Your fear simply reveals a place where you aren’t yet trusting in Jesus. Don’t stay stuck in your fear, and don’t receive condemnation for your lack of faith. Jesus wants to move you past that into a place where your fears are replaced by faith. Follow him and learn to trust.

By Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•   Fear or Love?

•  Fear, Faith and Migraines by Dr. Muriel Larson

•  Salvation Explained


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May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.2 Corinthians 13:14 (NIV)


Read this as a prayer today –

In faith, I know this to be true:

•    Jesus, you are full of truth and grace, and you fill me with your truth and grace (John 1:14).

•    You are working within me to clear a channel so that your love flows through me into the lives of everyone I meet. When I find it difficult to love someone, I can be confident that you will love that person through me (Galatians 2:20-21).

•    I may not be where you need to be yet, but I am “confident of this, that he who began a good work in [me] will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus” (Philippians 1:6 NIV).

•    And I know “God is able to make all grace abound [in me], so that in all things at all times, having all that [I] need, [I] will abound in every good work” (2 Corinthians 9:8 NIV).

•    Thank you, Jesus – You have filled me with your grace and truth, brought me deep and permanently into the love of God, and given me the fellowship of the Holy Spirit. I am, at all times, filled with grace, mercy, and peace (2 Corinthians 13:14 NIV).

By Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•  How to Pray

•  Sample Prayers

•  Salvation Explained


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Contentment comes as we listen to the Holy Spirit


I am not saying this because I am in need, for I have learned to be content whatever the circumstances.” Philippians 4:11 (NIV)

The Bible teaches we can have contentment “whatever the circumstances”, when we stay close to Jesus (Philippians 4:11 NIV).

The contentment we find in Jesus is greater than anything the world has to offer. Contentment with Jesus is a treasure beyond imagination. We need not be troubled or afraid when we look for our contentment in Jesus (John 14:27; 1 Timothy 6:6).

Contentment comes as we listen to the Holy Spirit, learning that

the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking, but of righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Spirit” (Romans 14:17 NIV).

We know these things to be true because Jesus told us. He wanted us to know so that we would be content in his peace (John 16:33).

by Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•  Contentment and a Broken Ankle

•   Home Coming! – What will the home coming be like in heaven?

•  Salvation Explained


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Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love.” Ephesians 4:2 (NIV)

Developing patience comes through the learned skill of seeing other people the way God sees them. Practicing patience teaches us to keep looking toward the things above, where we witness God working in the most difficult of circumstances or within the most difficult of people.

The apostle Paul wrote, “Welcome with open arms fellow believers who don’t see things the way you do. And don’t jump all over them every time they do or say something you don’t agree with—even when it seems that they are strong on opinions but weak in the faith department. Remember, they have their own history to deal with. Treat them gently” (Romans 14:1 MSG).

Patience comes with practice. Most people can muster patience when it’s convenient; the real test comes with the stress of time slipping away, or when someone keeps making the same mistakes over and over again.

Patience comes with cost. Patience requires that you trust God’s timetable, setting aside your own quick-fix agenda, your rights and demands, not in a sense of co-dependent weakness, but with the sacrificial strength of the Jesus-life within you, where you sync with the deep, mysterious, ancient love of the Creator.

Patience comes through God’s love. Patience may cost you all the love you have, but that’s okay! God has more love in his love-bank than our minds could ever conceive
(1 Corinthians 6:9–10), so give all the love you have, God will give you more and more and more as you keep giving every ounce of love away. Can’t do it? Of course, you can’t.

I can’t; God can.

Allow his love and his patience to flow through you.

By Jon Walker
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“My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message.” John 17:20 (NIV)


During the Last Supper, Jesus prayed for himself and then he prayed for the disciples. And then, with the hour of his death approaching, he took time to pray for you. He prayed for all those who would believe through the ministry of the disciples, and that means you.

This is what he told God:

“My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me.

I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one: I in them and you in me. May they be brought to complete unity to let the world know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me.”

Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the worldJohn 17:23 (NIV).

Jesus prays for you still. “Therefore he is able to save completely those who come to God through him, because he always lives to intercede for them
Hebrews 7:25 (NIV).

Jesus wants you with him. “Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory . . .” John 17:24 (NIV).

By Jon Walker
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Further Reading

• Prayer is Talking to God

•  How to have a “Quiet Time”

•  Salvation Explained


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A prayer, beseeching our Heavenly Father.


Answer me when I call, O God of my righteousness! You have relieved me in my distress; Be gracious to me and hear my prayer.Psalm 4:1 (NASB)

Lord, we’re desperate for you. We’re bunched up in confusion, moving by impulse and fear, flitting here and there like a frenzied flock caught in the wilderness of the far country.

We are here! We are here! And we know you hear. You’ve heard us before; you’ve swept in and saved us from our hopeless paralysis.

Do it again, O, Holy One; how long must we wait?

And we hear you say, “Yes, how long? How long must I wait while you wear my grace and peace like a cheap cloak from a secondhand store?”

Oh God, I hear your heart. You set me apart; yet, I joined the crowd – like birds of a feather.

From now on, Abba, when the swirl and twirl shoves at me, instead of taking to panicked wings; I’ll let you quiet my soul.

I am ready now; I am willing now to be swept under the safety of your wings, as a hen gathers her chicks.” Matthew 23:37 (NKJV)

Question: Does this prayer sound like one you’ve prayed recently? What about sometime in the past?

By Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•   Sample Prayers

•  How to Pray

•  Salvation Explained


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God is always fair ; He’s pure and honest; He cannot break a promise , never fails to fulfill a promise and is trustworthy in everything He does.


For the word of the Lord is right and true; He is faithful in all He does. The Lord loves righteousness and justice; the earth is full of His unfailing love.”  Psalm 33:4–5 (NIV)

God is love (1 John 4:16), and so we know He is patient and kind; He’s never rude or self-seeking; He’s not easily angered, and He keeps no record of wrongs; He does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth; He always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres; He never fails (1 Corinthians 13:4–8).

God is always fair (Deuteronomy 32:4); He’s pure and honest (Hebrews 6:18); He cannot break a promise (Numbers 23:19), never fails to fulfill a promise (Joshua 21:45) and is trustworthy in everything He does (Psalm 33:4).

The issue, then, is not if God can be trusted;  the issue is with our ability to trust.

Your first step toward trusting God may be this simple: focus your attention on Him. When you focus on yourself, the inevitable result is worry, insecurity, anxiety, guilt, fear, and discouragement. But when you shift your focus to God, you’ll begin to experience hope, confidence, gratitude, and love. God gives peace to all who trust in Him
(Isaiah 26:3).

By Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•  Pressing the RESET button on our lives 

•   Keeping Yourself in God’s Love – even during painful times in your life

•  Salvation Explained


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Like a scarecrow in a melon patch, their idols cannot speak; they must be carried because they cannot walk. Do not fear them; they can do no harm nor can they do any good.” Jeremiah 10:5 (NIV)


Say this as a Prayer –

In faith, I know this to be true:

By God’s grace, I am able take control of my thoughts, weeding out the ones that don’t belong—those that might lead me away from God (2 Corinthians 10:5).

This is a choice I make; I am not helpless in controlling my mind. God has given me the mind of Christ to teach me how to think like Jesus thinks.

God has already given me powerful tools “for smashing warped philosophies, tearing down barriers erected against the truth of God, fitting every loose thought and emotion and impulse into the structure of life shaped by Christ” (2 Corinthians 10:5 MSG).

These God-tools are ready for me to use and they clear the ground for my growth toward maturity (2 Corinthians 10:6 MSG).

It is true that I am more than a conqueror through God, who loves me (Romans 8:37).

I know that my fight is not against flesh and blood; it is not against my brothers and sisters. They may be used by the rulers, authorities, and dark powers of this world, but people of flesh, blood, and bone are not the ones who fight against me (Ephesians 6:12).

Because this is true, God tells me to use his weapons, such as “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control” (Galatians 5:22–23 NIV).

God renews my spirit and calls me to a single-minded purpose, aligned with his heart and mind (Psalm 51:10; James 1:5–8; James 4:8).

Lord, I hold all this to be true, and my objective is to rely on your divine power to demolish any strongholds.

by Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•   Why Worry Yourself Sick? – by Muriel Larson

•   The Confession – Another touching  poem/prayer about God hearing our Cry.  by Katy Kauffman

•  Salvation Explained


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It’s simply Christ. Christ plus nothing.


“For I resolved to know nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified.” 1 Corinthians 2:2 (NIV)

If you’re thinking about making some New Year’s Resolutions, consider this one from The Apostle: “This year I resolve to know nothing but Christ and Him crucified.

Paul’s message is radically simple: Salvation is in Christ alone. What does this mean?

It’s not Christ plus your good behavior.

• It’s not Christ plus the years you taught a Bible study.

• It’s not Christ plus your tithe.

• It’s not Christ plus the church you attend.

• It’s not Christ plus the number of verses you memorize.

• It’s not Christ plus your title in the church.

• It’s not Christ plus wisdom from the latest Christian seminar.

• It’s not Christ plus a  fast.

• It’s not Christ plus a good driving record.

• It’s not Christ plus well-behaved children.

• It’s not Christ plus the right job.

• It’s not Christ plus the right spouse.

• It’s not Christ plus the latest technology.

It’s simply Christ. Christ plus nothing.

That’s a message that is as right throughout this coming year as it will be in 2999.

May your new resolution for the year be nothing but Christ and Him crucified.

by Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•  Measurable Goals

•  Affirmations | Commitments to God for the New Year

•  More New Year Articles

•  Salvation Explained


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“And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people.” Luke 2:8-10 (NIV)

Have you ever noticed God is always telling us to not be afraid? For instance, in the Bible, whenever an angel shows up with a message from God, the first thing the angel says is: “Do not be afraid.”

There are all kinds of reasons we might be afraid to receive a message from God: We’re afraid of change, afraid of losing control, afraid of sacrifice.

We’re afraid of living apart from the pretense that we must be good enough.

Yet, the good news of great joy is that you don’t have to be good enough because God is good enough on your behalf!

The Bible teaches us to fight fear with faith—faith that Jesus will cover all our sins and shortcomings.

Practical Nativity:

  •  Replace fear with faith. God’s perfect love drives out all fear (1 John4:18). As you abandon your fears, ask God to guide you toward great faith: “I believe, Lord; help my unbelief.”
  •  Chase God, not perfection. You will never reach perfection, but Jesus, through his death and resurrection, is your perfection. God doesn’t love you because you’re the best in your class or because you try really hard. God loves you because he loves you. Slow down, shake off your anxiety, and meditate on that.

by Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•   Fear, Faith and Migraines – Renewing your mind can help renew your body
•   Christmas Section
•  Salvation Explained


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I know my God goes before me and comes behind me (Psalm 139:5). He is “my refuge, a strong tower against the foe” (Psalm 61:3 NIV).


“Today I have made you a fortified city, an iron pillar and a bronze wall to stand against the whole land—against the kings of Judah, its officials, its priests and the people of the land.” Jeremiah 1:18 (NIV)

Say this as a prayer –

In faith, I know this to be true:

By God’s hand, I am “a fortified city, an iron pillar and a bronze wall to stand against the whole land,” (Jeremiah 1:18 NIV) and I am enabled to fear no one but God.

I will not fear for I know God is with me. When I face fear, he whispers in my ear, “Do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand” (Isaiah 41:10 NIV).

He says, “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you” (Deuteronomy 31:6 NIV).

When standing before fear, I can boldly say,Who will bring any charge against those whom God has chosen? It is God who justifies. Who is he that condemns? Christ Jesus, who died—more than that, who was raised to life—is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? . . . No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us” (Romans 8:33–35, 37 NIV).

I know my God goes before me and comes behind me (Psalm 139:5). He ismy refuge, a strong tower against the foe” (Psalm 61:3 NIV).

And, because of this, I stand convinced that, “neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:38–39 NIV).

By Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•   God is Bigger than all my Problems
•  A Bible Study on Waiting on God By Sylvia Gunter
•  Salvation Explained


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We pray for others like Jesus would pray for them, thinking about them the way he would think, covering them with prayer, protecting them through prayer, and advocating for them in the same way Jesus sits at the right hand of the Father and advocates for us.


“He saw that there was no one, he was appalled that there was no one to intervene …” Isaiah 59:16 (NIV)

Most of our prayers are of the low order, or maybe more like the fast-food order.

We pull up to the drive-thru and yell out our requests to God and then expect him to have our order ready by the time we pull up to the window.

Yet, God’s view of prayer seems far above the utilitarian. He calls us to a violent form of intercession, where we take on the spiritual forces of darkness on behalf of our race, once invaded, now occupied by the prince of darkness.

Paul teaches us to put on the whole armor of God. If you follow the sequence of his instruction, we’re suiting up for battle so we can stand firm in prayer
(Ephesians 6).

We pray for others like Jesus would pray for them, thinking about them the way he would think, covering them with prayer, protecting them through prayer, and advocating for them in the same way Jesus sits at the right hand of the Father and advocates for us.

It is other-centered prayer on the extreme end of “other.

Isaiah describes God as “appalled” that no one was interceding for his people. We have the ability — more appropriately, the duty — to intercede on behalf of our brothers and sisters (Isaiah 59:16 NIV).

And we do not do this alone, for the Lord is already interceding, and we are simply joining him. Like the armor Paul describes for us, the Lord is suited for battle. Isaiah says: “He put on righteousness as his breastplate, and the helmet of salvation on his head; he put on the garments of vengeance and wrapped himself in zeal as in a cloak” (Isaiah 59:17 NIV).

Thoughts:

•    Ephesians 6 says to pray “on all occasions.” At which occasions have you been more likely to pray?

•    How does it change your confidence and your prayer life to know that God is interceding on behalf of his people?

by Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•   What Should Be Included in Prayer?
•   How to be sure God Listens to your Prayers
•  Salvation Explained


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“I can do everything through Him who gives me strength.” Philippians 4:13 (NIV)

We’re not as strong as we think we are, but God is stronger than we think.

You become strong through God’s strength. His strength enters your life, delivered by the Holy Spirit—Jesus within—and the more dependent you are on God, the stronger in Him you become. In our weakness, He is strong (2 Corinthians 12:10).

I can do everything . . .” doesn’t mean, ‘Now that I’m a believer, I’m strong enough to do everything and anything for God.” Your own testimony can attest to the fears and failures related to such thinking.

The strength of “I can do everything . . .” comes through God, who gives you the strength you need for each day. Your ability todo everything” is wholly dependent upon Him because your strength is dependent upon Him. It’s not a strength you work up to by pumping iron with emotional or mental barbells.

Strength comes from submission. The thing you do that may require the greatest strength is to submit yourself completely to God! But God is “working in you, giving you the desire to obey Him and the power to do what pleases Him” (Philippians 2:13 NLT).

Strength is linked to faith. You believe in faith that God is giving you His strength; and so, in faith you can act in confidence, knowing the strength is there: “But the Lord stood at my side and gave me strength” (2 Timothy 4:17 NIV).

By Jon Walker
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Further Reading

God Listens to Us
• A Bible Study on Waiting on God By Sylvia Gunter
•  Salvation Explained

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While Peter was wondering about the meaning of the vision, the men sent by Cornelius found out where Simon’s house was and stopped at the gate.”  Acts 10:17

Praying on a rooftop in Caesarea, Peter, the apostle of stomp and snort, is hungry, and while he waits for his daily bread to be prepared, he seeks the everlasting bread of life (John 6:48). Deeply submerged in the presence of God, Peter sees a vision of food forbidden.

He recoils, saying, “Surely not, Lord! . . . I have never eaten anything impure or unclean” (Acts 10:14). A heavenly voice says, “Do not call anything impure that God has made clean” (Acts 10:15).

Peter’s perplexed, but at the same time, God is working his plan. Across town is a centurion seeking the one true God. He is a Gentile; he is, in a figurative sense, food forbidden. But God says to look for a man named Peter; and Peter, still wondering what the vision meant, sees three men from Cornelius approaching on the street below.

The Holy Spirit says to Peter, “Simon, three men are looking for you. So get up and go downstairs. Do not hesitate to go with them, for I have sent them” (Acts 10:19-20). Peter follows the men to Cornelius’ house and finds a crowd already waiting to hear the good news of Jesus, the Christ.

Cornelius tells Peter that, four days before, God promised to send a messenger. In that instant, Peter knew he was the messenger and that the vision meant the gospel is for all people, even Gentiles.

And as Peter began to tell Cornelius’ crowd how to make peace with God, the Holy Spirit descended upon them all, even those who were Gentile.

Oswald Chambers described God as the Great Engineer, creating circumstances to bring about moments in our lives of divine importance, leading us to such divine appointments.

You’ve seen how God did this in the lives of Peter and Cornelius; will you watch now for how God engineers divine encounters in the life you can no longer call your own?

Question: Do you expect God to be at work in your own life?

by Jon Walker
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Further Reading

•  Divine Appointments by Katherine Kehler
•  Conversation Starters to transition to Spiritual things
•  Salvation Explained

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