Category: <span>thoughts by Charles Spurgeon</span>


“God, even our own God.” Psalm 67:6

It is strange how little use we make of the spiritual blessings which God gives us, but it is stranger still how little use we make of God Himself. Though He is ‘our own God,’ we rarely take our problems to Him, and ask little of Him. Seldom do we seek counsel at the hands of the Lord. In fact, we often we go about our daily lives without seeking His guidance!

In our troubles we constantly strive to bear our burdens ourselves, instead of casting them upon the Lord so that He will sustain us. We can take our problems to God, for the Lord seems to say,

I am yours, come and make use of me as you need; you may come freely to use my resources, and to Me, the welcome offerer.”

It is our own fault if we don’t make use of the riches of our God. Since you have such a friend, and He invites you, draw from Him daily. Never crave spiritual nourishment when you have such a great God to go to; never fear or faint while you have God to help you. Go to your treasure and take whatever you need “there is all that you can want. Learn the divine skill of making God all things to you. He can supply you with all, or, better still, He can simply ‘be’ to you instead of all”.

Let me urge you, then, to make use of your God. Make use of Him in prayer. Go to Him often, because He is your God. Who would disdain to use so great a privilege? Fly to Him, tell Him all your wants. Use Him constantly by faith at all times. If some dark thoughts are clouding your mind, use thy God as a ‘sun’. If someone is causing you harm, find in God a ‘shield’. For He is a sun and shield to His people. If you have lost your way in the mazes of life, use Him as a ‘guide’ for He will direct your steps. Whatever you are, and wherever you are, remember God is just what you want, and just where you want, and that He can do all you want.

Questions: Do you sometimes find it difficult to pray? What prevents you from having a more active prayer life?

By Charles Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.
Used by Permission

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/c-spurgeon_what-you-want/


Further Reading

•   God Is…

•   In the Stillness

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love.”
1 John 4:8

The distinguishing mark of a Christian is their confidence in the love of Christ, and the relenting of their hearts to Christ in return. Faith sets its seal on us by enabling us to praise Jesus who “loved me and gave Himself for me.” (Galatians 2:20) Then love will give in return!

We love because he first loved us.1 John 4:19

In old days, in the earliest time of the Christian religion, this reciprocal love was clearly seen in Jesus’ followers. They were men and women who knew the love of Christ, and rested on it like someone might lean on a trusty cane. The love they felt towards the Lord was not a quiet emotion hidden deep within! They didn’t only speak of their love in private meetings on the first day of the week. When they sang hymns in honor of the crucified savior Jesus Christ, it was with a passion that was so enthusiastic and powerful that it shone through in all their actions, their speech, and even the look in their eyes.

Love to Jesus was a flame which was fueled by the heart of their passion. From there its force burned its way outward to shine brightly into the world. Devotion to the glory of Jesus was the outward sign of all genuine Christians. Due to Christ’s love they risked much, and because of their love to Christ they accomplished much.

And it’s still the same today! We, the children of God, are still ruled in our lives by the power of love. The love of Christ should still cause us to rejoice. Do we feel our hearts lit afire by the Holy Spirit, and then by force of the gratitude they feel as the love of the Savior fills our hearts?

My reader, do you love Him? I urge you not to lay down to sleep tonight before pondering an honest answer to this most important question!

by Charles Spurgeon

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/c-spurgeon_gods-love-hearts/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Subscribe to Daily Devotionals by Email

Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

“Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love.” 1 John 4:8


The distinguishing mark of a Christian is their confidence in the love of Christ, and the relenting of their hearts to Christ in return. Faith sets its seal on us by enabling us to praise Jesus who “loved me and gave Himself for me.” (Galatians 2:20) Then love will give in return!

We love because he first loved us.” 1 John 4:19

In old days, in the earliest time of the Christian religion, this reciprocal love was clearly seen in Jesus’ followers. They were men and women who knew the love of Christ, and rested on it like someone might lean on a trusty cane. The love they felt towards the Lord was not a quiet emotion hidden deep within! They didn’t only speak of their love in private meetings on the first day of the week. When they sang hymns in honor of the crucified Savior Jesus Christ, it was with a passion that was so enthusiastic and powerful that it shone through in all their actions, their speech, and even the look in their eyes.

Love to Jesus was a flame which was fueled by the heart of their passion. From there its force burned its way outward to shine brightly into the world. Devotion to the glory of Jesus was the outward sign of all genuine Christians. Due to Christ’s love they risked much, and because of their love to Christ they accomplished much.

And it’s still the same today! We, the children of God, are still ruled in our lives by the power of love. The love of Christ should still cause us to rejoice. Do we feel our hearts lit afire by the Holy Spirit, and then by force of the gratitude they feel as the love of the Savior fills our hearts?

My reader, do you love Him? I urge you not to lay down to sleep tonight before pondering an honest answer to this most important question!

By Charles Spurgeon
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•  Going Deeper with God

•   Poems

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Immediately the rooster crowed the second time. Then Peter remembered the word Jesus had spoken to him: “Before the rooster crows twice you will disown me three times.” And he broke down and wept.” Mark 14:72


As long as Peter lived, a fountain of tears began to flow whenever he remembered how he denied his Lord. It is not unlikely that it was so, for his sin was very great, and grace granted to him afterwards was even greater.

This same experience is common to all of God’s children, according to the degree the Holy Spirit has removed your natural heart of stone. We, like Peter, remember our boastful promises: “Even if everyone else deserts you, I will never desert you.” (Matthew 26:33, NLT) We eat our own words with the bitter herbs of repentance. When we think of how we promised we would act, and how often in overt or subtle ways, we have denied our Lord, we may weep whole showers of grief.

Peter must have contemplated, at length, his denial of his Lord. The place in which he did it, the reasons that led him into such heinous sin, the lies and blasphemies he uttered, and the dreadful hardness of heart which drove him to do so again and yet again. How can we, when we are reminded of our misdeeds, and their exceeding sinfulness, remain indifferent and stubborn? Shouldn’t we repent of our sin, and cry to the Lord for renewed assurances of His pardoning love? May we never take a dry-eyed look at sin. Doing so threatens us on a dangerous and lonely path, with a tongue parched in the flames of hell.

But Peter must also have thought about his Master’s look of love. The Lord followed up the rooster’s warning voice with an cautioning look of sorrow, pity, and love. That glance was never out of Peter’s mind so long as he lived. It was far more effectual than ten thousand sermons would have been without the Holy Spirit. The regretful apostle would be sure to weep when he recollected the Savior’s full forgiveness, which restored him to his former place. (John 21:15-19)

To think that we have offended so kind and good a Lord is more than sufficient reason for being constant weepers, both out of sorrowful repentance and at the same time joyful, thankful forgiveness. Lord, smite our rocky hearts, and make the waters flow.

By Charles H Spurgeon
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2009.

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•  Forgiveness – Yourself and  Others

•  The Power of Forgiveness | by Dr. Henry Brandt

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

“I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint.” Psalm 22:14


Did heaven or Earth ever witness a sadder spectacle? In soul and body, our Lord felt Himself to be weak as water poured out on the ground. Placing of the cross in its socket shook Him with great violence, strained all His ligaments, pained every nerve, and more or less dislocated His bones. Burdened with His own weight, the glorious sufferer felt the strain increasing every moment of those six long hours. His sense of faintness and general weakness were overpowering. As He began to lose consciousness, His physical body became a mass of misery and swooning sickness.

The prophet Daniel once saw a great vision, prophesying Jesus’ suffering hundreds of years later, which he describes like this: “So I was left alone, gazing at this great vision; I had no strength left, my face turned deathly pale and I was helpless.” (Daniel 10:8) The pain our greater Prophet Jesus felt must have been incomprehensibly more dire as He felt it throughout His own soul. To us, sensations such as our Lord endured would have been unbearable. In His case, though already wounded, and still felt the sword. He drained the cup and tasted every drop.

As we kneel before our now ascended Savior’s throne, let us remember the way He prepared it as a throne of grace for us. Let us in spirit drink of His cup, that we will be strengthened for our hour of distress whenever it comes. In His natural body every part suffered, and so must it be in the spiritual body of which we are all now a part. But just like how out of all His grief and suffering His body came through uninjured to glory and power, so too will His spiritual body of the church here on Earth come through all its hardships and pain without so much as a blemish.

Question: What was the result of Jesus’ pain and sacrifice?

By Charles Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2009.
Used by Permission

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•   Jesus’ Resurrection: Fact or Fiction?  Resurrection evidences made clear and simple.

•   Who’s Got the Body?   A short, documented examination of evidences for Jesus’ resurrection.  By Rusty Wright

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

“May they sing of the ways of the LORD, for the glory of the LORD is great.” Psalm 138:5


The time when Christians begin to sing songs of praise to God is when they first lose their burdens at the foot of the cross. Not even the songs of the angels seem so sweet as the first song which gushes from the inmost soul of the forgiven child of God. John Bunyan describes such songs in his classic book “The Pilgrim’s Progress. Bunyan says when poor Pilgrim lost his burden at the cross, he leapt into the air, and went on his way singing “Blest Cross! Blest Sepulcher! Blest rather be The Man that there was put to shame for me!

Do you remember the day when your shackles fell off? Do you remember the place when Jesus met you, and said, “I have loved you with everlasting love. I have absorbed your transgressions; they will never be held against you again.” What a sweet season it is when Jesus takes away the pain of sin and replaces it with the joy of serving Him in spirit and truth!

When the Lord first pardoned my sin, I was so full of joy that I could scarcely refrain from dancing! I thought on my road home from where I’d been saved that I must tell the stones in the street the story of my salvation. My soul was so full of joy that I wanted to tell every snow-flake that was falling from heaven of the wonderful love of Jesus, who blotted out the sins of one of the chief of rebels against him … me.

But it is not only at the beginning of the Christian life that believers have reason sing. As long as we live we will discover new reasons to sing songs of praise to the Lord. Our experience of His constant loving kindness leads us to say, “I will extol the LORD at all times; his praise will always be on my lips.” (Psalm 34:1) See to it, friend, that you magnify the Lord this day, in songs of praise on your lips and through your life.

Questions: What is your favorite (or one of your favorite) Christian worship songs, and why? What does it say to you about God?

By Charles Spurgeon
Used by Permission

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

Some Thoughts on Worship

The Confession

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

“Taste and see that the LORD is good; blessed is the man who takes refuge in him.” Psalm 34:8


Faith in scripture is described as being known through all the senses:

  • Faith is sight:Look unto me, and be ye saved.” (Isaiah 45:22, KJV)
  • Faith is hearing:  “Hear me, that your soul may live.”  (Isaiah 55:3)
  • Faith is smelling:  “All your robes are fragrant with myrrh and aloes and cassia.” (Psalm 45:8); “your name is like perfume poured out.” (Song of Solomon 1:3)
  • Faith is spiritual touch. “the woman came behind and touched the edge of Christ’s cloak (Luke 8:43-48) and likewise we handle the things of the good word of life.
  • Faith is equally the spirit’s taste. “How sweet are your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth.” (Psalm 119:103“I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man, says Jesus, and drink his blood, you have no life in you.” (John 6:53) This “taste” is faith in one of its highest qualities.

One of the first experiences of faith is hearing. We hear the voice of God, not with the outward ear alone, but with the inward ear. We hear it as God’s Word, and we believe it to be so; that is the  hearing” of faith.

Then our mind looks on the truth as it is presented to us. We understand it and perceive its meaning; that is the “seeing” of faith.

Next we discover its preciousness. We begin to admire it, and find how fragrant it is; that is faith in its  “smell.

Then we embrace the mercies which are prepared for us in Christ; that is faith in its “touch.”

Therefore what follows from all of these enjoyments? Peace, delight, communion – which are faith in its  taste.”

Any one of these paths to faith is saving. To hear Christ’s voice as the sure voice of God in the soul will save us. But true enjoyment is the aspect of faith where Christ, by holy taste, is received into us, and made, by inward and spiritual understanding of His sweetness and preciousness, to be the food of our souls. It is then we sit “under His shadow with great delight.” (Song of Solomon 2:3, KJV) and find His fruit sweet to our taste.

Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow up in your salvation, now that you have tasted that the Lord is good.”  1 Peter 2:2-3

Question: Which way of  “perceiving faith”  is most effective for you, and why?

By Charles H Spurgeon
Used by Permission

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, published in “Mornings & Evenings,”


Further Reading

Jesus is Always There!

God is Holy….

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

“How precious to me are your thoughts, O God! How vast is the sum of them!” Psalm 139:17


Divine omniscience (God’s all-knowingness) gives no comfort to the ungodly mind, but to the child of God it overflows with consolation. God is always thinking about us, never turns aside His mind from us, and always has us before His eyes. This is precisely what we want and need, because it would be dreadful to exist for a moment beyond the observation of our heavenly Father.

His thoughts are always tender, loving, wise, sensible, and far-reaching. They bring to us countless benefits, so it is a choice delight to remember them. The Lord always did think about His people, and so comes their election and the covenant of grace by which their salvation is secured. And He will always think about them, and this will result in their final perseverance by which they will be brought safely to their final rest.

In all our wanderings the watchful glance of the Eternal Watcher is always fixed on us, and we never roam beyond the Shepherd’s eye. In our sorrows He observes us incessantly, and no painful moment escapes Him. In our trials He perceives all our weariness, and writes in His book all the struggles of His faithful ones. These thoughts of the Lord encompass us in all our paths, and penetrate the innermost region of our being. Not a nerve or tissue, valve or vessel, of our bodily organization is uncared for. All the little ones of our world are in the thoughts of the great God.

Dear reader, is this precious to you? Then hold steadfastly to it. Never be led astray by those philosophic fools who preach about an impersonal God (deism) or talk of self-existent, self-governing matter (naturalism). The Lord lives and thinks about us, this is a truth far too precious for us to ever abandon. Catching the attention of an important person is valued so highly that those who have it counts their blessings. But if that is so, how much more valuable is it to be constantly in the thoughts of the King of kings! If the Lord’s thoughts are on me, all is well, and we may rejoice evermore.

Have you considered that you are constantly in God’s thoughts? Does this truth give you comfort and confidence?

by Charles H. Spurgeon
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•   God Listens to Us

•   God Demonstrates His Love

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

“Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.”  Psalm 119:49


Whatever your specific need is, you will likely find a promise about it in the Bible.

Are you feeling wearied and weak because your life has been troubling and tiring? Here is the promise: “He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak.” (Isaiah 40:29) When you read such a promise, take it back to our great God who promised it, and ask Him to fulfill His own word.

Are you seeking after Christ, and yearning for closer relationship with Him? This promise shines like a star upon you: “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.” (Matthew 5:6) Take that promise to God’s throne continually. Do not plead anything else, but go to God over and over again, praying “Lord, You have said it, I humbly ask that You do as You have said.”

Are you distressed because of sin, and burdened with the heavy load of your wrongdoings? Listen to these words: “I, even I, am he who blots out your transgressions, for my own sake, and remembers your sins no more.” (Isaiah 43:25) You have no worth of your own to deserve God’s pardon, but plead His written promises and He will perform them.

Are you afraid that you won’t be able to persevere to the end? Do you fear that, after having thought yourself to be a child of God, you might instead be a ‘castaway’? Take this word of grace to God’s throne and plead it: “Though the mountains be shaken and the hills be removed, yet my unfailing love for you will not be shaken nor my covenant of peace be removed.” (Isaiah 54:10)

If you have lost the sweet sense of the Savior’s presence, and are seeking Him with a sorrowful heart, remember these promises: “Return to me, and I will return to you” (Malachi 3:7) and “For a brief moment I abandoned you, but with deep compassion I will bring you back.” (Isaiah 54:7) Rest your faith upon God’s own word, and whatever your fears or desires, look to God’s “Bank of Faith” in your Father’s written word, saying, “Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.

Question: Which of God’s promises that you just read resonated most powerfully with you, and why?

By Charles H Spurgeon
Used by Permission

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

• Prayer and the Promises  #4 in the Prayer Series by Barbara Epp

Going Deeper with God

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest


Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Consider how meditating on God’s Word has helped bring rejoicing and peace into your heart.


Exceeding great and precious promises 2 Peter 1:4, (KJV)

If you would like to put into practice the preciousness of God’s promises, and enjoy them personally, meditate on them. God’s promises are like grapes in a wine-press: If you tread on them the juice will flow. Thinking over God’s holy words will often lead to their fulfillment in your own life. While you ponder them, the blessing you seek will often come to you in ways you don’t even expect. Many Christians who have thirsted for God’s promises have found the divine favor which they ensure gently brings comforting into their soul and causes great rejoicing in their hearts.

Besides meditating on God’s promises, seek to receive them as being the very words of God. Say to yourself, “If I were dealing with a mere human being’s promise, I would need to carefully weigh the ability and the character of the person who promised me. But with the promises of God, even though the greatness of the promise itself may stagger me, my eye must instead be fixated on the greatness of the Promiser.” That will comfort me and give me confidence in His words.

My friend, it is God Almighty who has made these promises. God, who cannot lie, who speaks His promises to you: That “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.” (Deuteronomy 31:6) His Word is as true as His own existence. God is unchangeable and He has not changed anything which has come out of His mouth, and never called back one single word. He lacks no power, for this is the God that made the heavens and the earth. And He can never lack wisdom, because He, in his infinite understanding, knows when it is best to give and when better to take away.

Therefore, seeing that it is the word of a God true, unchangeable, powerful, and so incomparably wise, I will and must believe His promises. If we meditate on His promises, and consider the Promiser, we will experience their sweetness and fulfillment.

Father God, Help me to be steadfast in meditating on Your Word. May it bring renewal and fresh life to my soul. Amen.

Consider how meditating on God’s Word has helped bring rejoicing and peace into your heart.

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.
Used by Permission

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

God Provides for His Own

Truth  God’s truth remains the same from age to age

•  Salvation Explained


Follow Us On:  Facebook  • Twitter  •  Instagram  •  Pinterest

Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men


Now may our Lord Jesus Christ Himself, and our God and Father, who has loved us and given us everlasting consolation and good hope by grace, comfort your hearts and establish you in every good word and work.” 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17 (NKJV)

Consolation.” There is music in the word: like David’s harp, it charms away the evil spirit of depression.

It was a distinguished honor to Barnabas to be called “the son of consolation.” (Acts 4:36, KJV) It is one of the most illustrious names given to any man, for Barnabas shone with some measure of the light of the Lord Jesus who is “the consolation of Israel.” (Luke 2:25)

Everlasting consolation.” This is most important part, for the eternity of comfort is the crown and glory of it. What is this “everlasting consolation”? First, it includes a sense of pardoned sin. A Christian son or daughter has received in their heart the witness of the Spirit that their iniquities are put away like a cloud. If sin is pardoned, isn’t that an everlasting consolation?

Next, the Lord gives His people an abiding sense of acceptance in Christ. The Christian knows that God looks on them as standing in union with Jesus. Union to the risen Lord is a consolation of the most abiding order; it is, in fact, everlasting. With this blessed assurance, let sickness prostrate us. Haven’t we seen hundreds of believers as happy in the weakness of disease as they would have been in the strength blossoming health? Let also death’s arrows pierce us to the heart. Our comfort never dies, because our ears are full of the songs of saints as they have rejoiced because the living love of God was shed abroad in their hearts in dying moments.

Yes, a sense of acceptance in the Beloved is an everlasting consolation. Moreover, the Christian has a conviction of their security. God has promised to save those who trust in Christ. The Christian does trust in Christ, and we believe that God will be as good as His word, and will save us. We are safe by virtue of being bound up with the person and work of our everlasting consolation, our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon,
published in “Mornings & Evenings,”
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2010.

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

How God Demonstrates His Love
God’s Plan – A Study on God’s Destiny for Me?
•  Salvation Explained

Follow Us On:

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
Pinterest

Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men


“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.” Matthew 5:9 (TNIV)

This is the seventh of the beatitudes, and seven was the number of perfection among the Hebrews. It may be that the Savior placed this blessing seventh on the list because the peaceful child of God is perfected in the person of Jesus Christ.

Anyone who seeks perfect blessedness (as far as it can be experienced here and now on Earth) must grasp this seventh benediction and become a peacemaker. There is significance in the position of this verse. The verse which comes before it speaks of the blessedness of “the pure in heart: for they will see God.” Understand that we are to be “first pure, then peaceable.” (James 3:17, KJV) Our peaceableness must never permit sinful behavior or toleration of evil. We must set our faces sternly against everything which is contrary to God and His holiness. Once our souls are settled, we can continue on towards peaceableness.

The verse that follows also seems to be positioned on purpose: “Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” Regardless of how peaceable we may be, we will be misrepresented and misunderstood. And this should be no surprise, because even the Prince of Peace, by His perfect peacefulness, ended up bringing fire on the earth. Jesus Christ, though He loved humankind and did no harm, was “despised and rejected by men, a man of sorrows, and familiar with suffering.” (Isaiah 53:3) Therefore, the peaceable in heart should not be surprised when they meet with enemies, despite their peacefulness.

Lord, give us grace to climb towards this seventh beatitude! Purify our minds that we may be “first pure, then peaceable,” and fortify our souls, that our peaceableness may not lead us into cowardice and despair when, for Your sake, we are persecuted.

Question: Where in your life can you act as a peacemaker?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2009
Used by Permission

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•   Four Ways to Pray for Friends and Family
•   Extending Grace to Others
•  Salvation Explained

Follow Us On:

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
Pinterest

Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men


“Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.”  Psalm 119:49

Whatever your specific need is, you will likely find a promise about it in the Bible.

Are you feeling wearied and weak because your life has been troubling and tiring? Here is the promise: “He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak.” (Isaiah 40:29) When you read such a promise, take it back to our great God who promised it, and ask Him to fulfill His own word.

Are you seeking after Christ, and yearning for closer relationship with Him? This promise shines like a star upon you: “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.” (Matthew 5:6) Take that promise to God’s throne continually. Do not plead anything else, but go to God over and over again, praying “Lord, You have said it, I humbly ask that You do as You have said.”

Are you distressed because of sin, and burdened with the heavy load of your wrongdoings? Listen to these words: “I, even I, am he who blots out your transgressions, for my own sake, and remembers your sins no more.” (Isaiah 43:25) You have no worth of your own to deserve God’s pardon, but plead His written promises and He will perform them.

Are you afraid that you won’t be able to persevere to the end? Do you fear that, after having thought yourself to be a child of God, you might instead be a ‘castaway‘? Take this word of grace to God’s throne and plead it: “Though the mountains be shaken and the hills be removed, yet my unfailing love for you will not be shaken nor my covenant of peace be removed.” (Isaiah 54:10)

If you have lost the sweet sense of the Savior’s presence, and are seeking Him with a sorrowful heart, remember these promises: “Return to me, and I will return to you” (Malachi 3:7) and “For a brief moment I abandoned you, but with deep compassion I will bring you back.” (Isaiah 54:7) Rest your faith upon God’s own word, and whatever your fears or desires, look to God’s “Bank of Faith” in your Father’s written word, saying, “Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.”

Question: Which of God’s promises that you just read resonated most powerfully with you, and why?

by Charles H. Spurgeon
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•   We Plan – God Directs
•  Stepping Into a Personal Revival
•  Salvation Explained

Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men


“Taste and see that the LORD is good; blessed is the man who takes refuge in Him.”  Psalm 34:8

Faith in scripture is described as being known through all the senses:

•    Faith is sight:Look unto me, and be ye saved.” (Isaiah 45:22, KJV)

•    Faith is hearing:  “Hear me, that your soul may live.”  (Isaiah 55:3)

•    Faith is smelling:  “All your robes are fragrant with myrrh and aloes and cassia.” (Psalm 45:8); “your name is like perfume poured out.” (Song of Solomon 1:3)

•    Faith is spiritual touch. By this faith the woman came behind and touched the edge of Christ’s cloak (Luke 8:43-48) and likewise we handle the things of the good word of life.

•    Faith is equally the spirit’s taste. “How sweet are your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth.” (Psalm 119:103)  “I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man, says Jesus, and drink his blood, you have no life in you.” (John 6:53) This “taste” is faith in one of its highest qualities.

One of the first experiences of faith is hearing. We hear the voice of God, not with the outward ear alone, but with the inward ear. We hear it as God’s Word, and we believe it to be so; that is the  “hearing” of faith.

Then our mind looks on the truth as it is presented to us. We understand it and perceive its meaning; that is the “seeing” of faith.

Next we discover its preciousness. We begin to admire it, and find how fragrant it is; that is faith in its  “smell.”

Then we embrace the mercies which are prepared for us in Christ; that is faith in its “touch.

Therefore what follows from all of these enjoyments? Peace, delight, communion – which are faith in its  “taste.”

Any one of these paths to faith is saving. To hear Christ’s voice as the sure voice of God in the soul will save us. But true enjoyment is the aspect of faith where Christ, by holy taste, is received into us, and made, by inward and spiritual understanding of His sweetness and preciousness, to be the food of our souls. It is then we sit “under His shadow with great delight.” (Song of Solomon 2:3, KJV) and find His fruit sweet to our taste.

Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow up in your salvation, now that you have tasted that the Lord is good.”  1 Peter 2:2-3

Question: Which way of  “perceiving faith”  is most effective for you, and why?

By Charles Spurgeon
Used by Permission
published in “Mornings & Evenings”

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•   Elma’s Story – Nothing Left To Give
•   Are you Humble? What is Humility?
•  Salvation Explained

Follow Us On:

Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
Pinterest

Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men


“Sing the glory of his name; make his praise glorious!” Psalm 66:2

It isn’t optional whether we’ll praise God or not. God is most worthy of praise, and every Christian, as the recipient of His grace, has been given both the wonderful opportunity and the obligation to praise God daily. Although we have no set of rules governing daily praise and we have no commandment prescribing certain hours to sing or give thanks, the law written on our hearts teaches us that it is right to praise God. The unwritten urgency comes to us with as much force as if it had been recorded on tablets of stone, or handed to us from the top of thundering Sinai.

Yes, it is the Christian’s duty to praise God. It is not only a pleasurable exercise, but it is the absolute obligation of our lives. Don’t think that because you’re going through difficult circumstances that you are free to avoid your duty to your gracious God by choosing not to sing songs of praise. You are bound by His love to bless His name as long as you live, and His praise should continually be on your lips.

You are blessed in order that you may bless Him. “The people I formed for myself,” God declares, so that “they may proclaim my praise.” (Isaiah 43:21) If you do not praise God, you are not bringing forth the fruit which God rightly expects from your hands.

So don’t let your harp just hang on the wall, but take it down, and make music with a grateful heart. Stand up and chant His praise. With every morning’s dawn, lift up your prayers of thanksgiving, and let every setting sun be followed with your song. Overflow with praise! Surround the Earth with an atmosphere of melody, and God Himself will
hear from heaven and gladly accept your song.

Even so I love Thee, and will love, And in Thy praise will sing, Because Thou art my loving God, And my redeeming King.” (St. Francis Xavier)

Question: When is it most difficult for you to praise God, and why?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon,
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

We Welcome your comments.

Enter Email
reCAPTCHA

Further Reading

•  What is Worship? By Sylvia Gunter
•  Some Thoughts on Worship
•  Salvation Explained

Share this on:

thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men