Category: <span>thoughts by Charles Spurgeon</span>


“You crown the year with a bountiful harvest; even the hard pathways overflow with abundance.” Psalm 65:11


All year round, every hour of every day, God is richly blessing us.

He blesses us when we sleep, and when we wake His mercy is upon us. The sun may leave us a legacy of darkness, but our God never ceases to shine on His children with beams of love.

Like a river, His loving kindness is always flowing, with a fullness as inexhaustible as His own nature. Like the atmosphere which constantly surrounds the earth and sustains all life, the compassion of God surrounds all His creatures. In it, we live, and move, and have our being. (Acts 17:27-28)

Yet as the sun on summer days encourages us with beams more warm and bright than at other times, and as rivers are at certain seasons swollen by the rain, so is it with the mercy of God. His mercy has its golden hours, its days of overflow, when the Lord magnifies His grace to His children.

The blessings of the joyous days of harvest are a special season of excessive favor. It is in the glory of autumn that the ripe gifts of providence are abundantly bestowed. It is the mellow season of realization. Before there was nothing but hope and expectation, but great is the joy of harvest. Happy are the harvesters who fill their arms with the yield of heaven!

The Psalmist tells us that the harvest is the “crown of the year.” Surely these crowning mercies call for crowning thanksgiving! Let us give it all to God it by fostering the inward emotion of gratitude. Let our hearts be warmed! Let our spirits remember, meditate, and think about the goodness of the Lord! Then let us praise Him with our lips, and magnify His name, from whose abundance all goodness flows. Finally, let us glorify God by yielding our gifts to His cause, giving a practical proof of our gratitude to the Lord of the harvest!

Question: How has God blessed you lately? Can you set aside time today to thank Him?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon,
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.

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Further Reading

•  Searching for a Higher Purpose

•  A Moving Mountain – Have you ever heard of a mountain moving a person?

•  Salvation Explained


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“Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.” Isaiah 7:14 (KJV)


Let’s today imagine ourselves in Bethlehem, in company of astounded shepherds and adoring Magi who have gathered to see Him who was born King of the Jews. Together we can sing in faith “Unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given.” Jesus is Jehovah incarnate, our Lord and our God, and yet our brother and friend. This is a new opportunity for us adore and admire Him.

Remember first His miraculous conception. It was a thing unheard of before, and unparalleled since, that a virgin would conceive and give birth to a Son.

God’s first promise in the Garden of Eden says “The seed of the woman,” not the offspring of man. A woman sinned in the Garden, but in God’s grace a woman also had the privilege of ushering in the one would will restore Paradise. Our Savior, although fully human, was in His human nature the Holy One of God. This realization should cause us to reverently bow before the holy Child whose innocence restores humankind to its ancient glory. Jesus is, in fact, our previous, and only, hope of glory.

Remember second His humble parents. His mother is described simply as “a virgin.” Not a princess, or prophetess. Not rich or powerful. What humble accommodations for a new-born king! Yet she could still sing the sweetest songs of praise and was chosen for her faithfulness to God despite her modest circumstances.

Immanuel, God with us … in our nature, our sorrow, our life, our death, and now with us forever. Or rather we are with Him, in resurrection, ascension, triumph, and glorious triumph.

Question: God with us … where do you turn when it feels like God isn’t with us, even though we know He is?

By Charles H. Spurgeon
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•  The Christmas Story – the story of Jesus Birth

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“Wherefore we would have come unto you … but Satan hindered us.” 1 Thessalonians 2:18 (KJV)


Since the first hour in which goodness came into conflict with evil, it has never ceased to be true in spiritual experience that Satan hinders us. From all points of the compass, all along the line of battle, in front and behind, at the dawn of day and in the midnight hour, Satan hinders us. If we toil in the field, he seeks to break the plow. If we build a wall, he labors to cast down the stones. If we serve God in suffering or in conflict, everywhere Satan hinders us.

He hinders us when we are first coming to Jesus Christ. Everyone experiences fierce conflicts with Satan when we first look to the cross and live. When we are saved, Satan endeavors to hinder the completeness of our personal character. You may be congratulating yourself, thinking “I have until now walked consistently and no one can challenge my integrity.” Beware of boasting, for your virtue will yet be tested. Satan will direct his efforts against that virtue for which you have become proud.

If you continue as a firm believer, your faith will soon be attacked. If you have been meek as Moses, expect to be tempted to speak unadvisedly with your lips. The birds will peck at your ripest fruit, and the wild boar will bludgeon his tusks against your choicest vines.

Satan is sure to hinder us when we are earnest in prayer. He attacks our persistence, and weakens our faith in order that, if possible, we may miss out on God’s blessing. Satan is vigilant in obstructing Christian effort. There was never a revival of religion without a revival of his opposition. As soon as Ezra and Nehemiah begin to labor, Sanballat and Tobiah are stirred up to hinder them.

We should not be alarmed when Satan hinders us. It is a proof that we are on the Lord’s side and are doing the Lord’s work. In His strength we shall win the victory, and triumph over our adversary.

Question: How have you been under spiritual attack lately? What resources has God provided to prevail against such attack?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.
Used by permission

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•  Pressing Your Reset Button

•  Guiltless is God’s Eyes

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“O LORD, do not forsake me; be not far from me, O my God.” Psalm 38:21


Frequently we pray that God will not forsake us in our hour of trial and temptation, but we forget that this prayer should be on our lips at all times. There is no moment of our life, however holy, when we can live without God’s constant upholding.

Whether in light or in darkness, in communion with the Lord or in temptation, we at all times need the prayer,

“O LORD, do not forsake me; be not far from me, O my God.” (Psalm 38:21)

A little child, while learning to walk, always needs her parents’ aid. The ship abandoned by the captain drifts at once from its course. Likewise, we cannot do without continued aid from above.

Let it then be your prayer to-day:

Do not forsake me Lord. Father, do not forsake your child, or he will fall by the hand of the enemy. Shepherd, do not forsake your lamb, or he will wander from the safety of the fold. Great Gardener, do not forsake your plant, or it will wither and die. ‘O LORD, do not forsake me; be not far from me, O my God,’ and do not forsake me at any moment of my life. Do not forsake me in my joys, or they will absorb my heart. Do not forsake me in my sorrows, or I will murmur against you. Do not forsake me in the day of my repentance, or I will lose the hope of pardon, and fall into despair. And do not forsake me in the day of my strongest faith, or my faith will degenerate into presumption. Do not forsake me, for without you I am weak, but with you I am strong. Do not forsake me, for my path is dangerous, and full of snares, and I cannot live without your guidance. The hen forsakes not her own brood, and I ask that you will even more cover me with your feathers, and permit me under your wings to find my refuge.

Be not far from me; for trouble is near; for there is  none to help.’ (Psalm 22:11)

Leave me not, neither forsake me, O God of my salvation.‘ (Psalm 27:9)”

“O ever in our cleansed breast, Bid Thine Eternal Spirit rest; And make our secret soul to be A temple pure and worthy Thee.”

Question: Have you ever felt forsaken by God? Were you really forsaken?

By Charles Spurgeon
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•  Good News for You

•  More than a Father

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“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” Matthew 11:28


The cry of the Christian faith is the gentle word, “Come.” The Jewish law harshly said, “Go, step carefully on the path in which you walk. If you break the commandments, you will perish; keep them, and you will live.” The law was a burden even as it was a blessing, which drove men and women before it harshly; the gospel draws with arms of love.

Jesus is the good Shepherd going before His sheep, urging them follow Him, and always leading them onwards with the sweet word, “Come.” The law repels, the gospel attracts. The law shows the distance which there is between God and man; the gospel bridges that awful chasm, and brings the sinner across it.

From the first moment of your spiritual life until you are ushered into glory, the language of Christ to you will be, Come, come to me.” As a mother puts out her finger to her little child and woos it to walk by saying, “Come,” even so does Jesus. He will always be ahead of you, urging you follow Him as the soldier follows his captain. He will always go before you to pave your way, and clear your path, and you will hear His winsome voice calling you after Him all through your life. Later, in the solemn hour of death, His sweet words with which He will usher you into the heavenly world will be “Come, you who are so blessed of my Father.”

This is not only Christ’s cry to you, but, if you are a believer, this is your cry to Christ: “Come! come!” You will be longing for His second coming; you will be saying, “Come quickly, come Lord Jesus.” You will be yearning for nearer and closer communion with Him. As His voice calls to you “Come,” your response to Him will also be “Come, Lord, and live with me. Come, and occupy alone the throne of my heart; reign there without a rival, and dedicate me entirely to Your service.”

Questions: When God calls you, are you ready to hear and obey? How can you prepare your mind and heart?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

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The Powerful Reality by Ruth Calkin

Struggles, Despair

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Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation.” Joel 1:3


In this simple way, by God’s grace, a living testimony for truth is always kept alive in the world. The beloved of the Lord are to hand down their witness of the gospel and the covenant to their heirs. And these heirs will pass it along to their next descendants.

This is our first duty. We are to begin in our own family homes. A person who does not start his ministry at home is an inadequate witness. Now, all people who do not know Christ are to be sought by all means, and all the highways and hedges are to be searched. But home has a greater priority, and woe to those who reverse the order of the Lord’s appointments.

To teach our children is a personal duty. We cannot delegate it to Sunday school teachers, or other friendly aids. These can assist us, but cannot deliver us from the sacred obligation. Any substitutes are evil and insufficient. Mothers and fathers must, like Abraham, command their households in the fear of God, and talk with their offspring concerning the wondrous works of the Most High. Parental teaching is a natural duty. Who are more fit to look after a child’s well-being as those who are the authors of his actual being?

To neglect the instruction of our children is worse than wicked. Education in the faith is necessary for the world, for the family itself, and for the church of God. In a thousand ways insidious false teaching is covertly advancing in the world, and one of the most effective means for resisting it is almost always neglected, namely, the instruction of children in the faith.

I pray that parents would awaken to the importance of this matter. It is a pleasant duty to talk about Jesus with our sons and daughters, and all the more so because God has saved children through their parents’ prayers and patient instruction. May every house into which this devotional is read honor the Lord and receive His smile.

Questions: What makes it difficult to instruct children in the Christian faith? What nevertheless makes that effort so necessary and worthwhile?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer
Used by Permission

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•  Family Articles and Inspirational Ideas

•  Top Ten Ways to Teach Values to Your Kids 

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“God, even our own God.” Psalm 67:6

It is strange how little use we make of the spiritual blessings which God gives us, but it is stranger still how little use we make of God Himself. Though He is ‘our own God,’ we rarely take our problems to Him, and ask little of Him. Seldom do we seek counsel at the hands of the Lord. In fact, we often we go about our daily lives without seeking His guidance!

In our troubles we constantly strive to bear our burdens ourselves, instead of casting them upon the Lord so that He will sustain us. We can take our problems to God, for the Lord seems to say,

I am yours, come and make use of me as you need; you may come freely to use my resources, and to Me, the welcome offerer.”

It is our own fault if we don’t make use of the riches of our God. Since you have such a friend, and He invites you, draw from Him daily. Never crave spiritual nourishment when you have such a great God to go to; never fear or faint while you have God to help you. Go to your treasure and take whatever you need “there is all that you can want. Learn the divine skill of making God all things to you. He can supply you with all, or, better still, He can simply ‘be’ to you instead of all”.

Let me urge you, then, to make use of your God. Make use of Him in prayer. Go to Him often, because He is your God. Who would disdain to use so great a privilege? Fly to Him, tell Him all your wants. Use Him constantly by faith at all times. If some dark thoughts are clouding your mind, use thy God as a ‘sun’. If someone is causing you harm, find in God a ‘shield’. For He is a sun and shield to His people. If you have lost your way in the mazes of life, use Him as a ‘guide’ for He will direct your steps. Whatever you are, and wherever you are, remember God is just what you want, and just where you want, and that He can do all you want.

Questions: Do you sometimes find it difficult to pray? What prevents you from having a more active prayer life?

By Charles Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.
Used by Permission

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•   God Is…

•   In the Stillness

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Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love.”
1 John 4:8

The distinguishing mark of a Christian is their confidence in the love of Christ, and the relenting of their hearts to Christ in return. Faith sets its seal on us by enabling us to praise Jesus who “loved me and gave Himself for me.” (Galatians 2:20) Then love will give in return!

We love because he first loved us.1 John 4:19

In old days, in the earliest time of the Christian religion, this reciprocal love was clearly seen in Jesus’ followers. They were men and women who knew the love of Christ, and rested on it like someone might lean on a trusty cane. The love they felt towards the Lord was not a quiet emotion hidden deep within! They didn’t only speak of their love in private meetings on the first day of the week. When they sang hymns in honor of the crucified savior Jesus Christ, it was with a passion that was so enthusiastic and powerful that it shone through in all their actions, their speech, and even the look in their eyes.

Love to Jesus was a flame which was fueled by the heart of their passion. From there its force burned its way outward to shine brightly into the world. Devotion to the glory of Jesus was the outward sign of all genuine Christians. Due to Christ’s love they risked much, and because of their love to Christ they accomplished much.

And it’s still the same today! We, the children of God, are still ruled in our lives by the power of love. The love of Christ should still cause us to rejoice. Do we feel our hearts lit afire by the Holy Spirit, and then by force of the gratitude they feel as the love of the Savior fills our hearts?

My reader, do you love Him? I urge you not to lay down to sleep tonight before pondering an honest answer to this most important question!

by Charles Spurgeon

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Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer

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“Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love.” 1 John 4:8


The distinguishing mark of a Christian is their confidence in the love of Christ, and the relenting of their hearts to Christ in return. Faith sets its seal on us by enabling us to praise Jesus who “loved me and gave Himself for me.” (Galatians 2:20) Then love will give in return!

We love because he first loved us.” 1 John 4:19

In old days, in the earliest time of the Christian religion, this reciprocal love was clearly seen in Jesus’ followers. They were men and women who knew the love of Christ, and rested on it like someone might lean on a trusty cane. The love they felt towards the Lord was not a quiet emotion hidden deep within! They didn’t only speak of their love in private meetings on the first day of the week. When they sang hymns in honor of the crucified Savior Jesus Christ, it was with a passion that was so enthusiastic and powerful that it shone through in all their actions, their speech, and even the look in their eyes.

Love to Jesus was a flame which was fueled by the heart of their passion. From there its force burned its way outward to shine brightly into the world. Devotion to the glory of Jesus was the outward sign of all genuine Christians. Due to Christ’s love they risked much, and because of their love to Christ they accomplished much.

And it’s still the same today! We, the children of God, are still ruled in our lives by the power of love. The love of Christ should still cause us to rejoice. Do we feel our hearts lit afire by the Holy Spirit, and then by force of the gratitude they feel as the love of the Savior fills our hearts?

My reader, do you love Him? I urge you not to lay down to sleep tonight before pondering an honest answer to this most important question!

By Charles Spurgeon
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer

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•  Going Deeper with God

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Immediately the rooster crowed the second time. Then Peter remembered the word Jesus had spoken to him: “Before the rooster crows twice you will disown me three times.” And he broke down and wept.” Mark 14:72


As long as Peter lived, a fountain of tears began to flow whenever he remembered how he denied his Lord. It is not unlikely that it was so, for his sin was very great, and grace granted to him afterwards was even greater.

This same experience is common to all of God’s children, according to the degree the Holy Spirit has removed your natural heart of stone. We, like Peter, remember our boastful promises: “Even if everyone else deserts you, I will never desert you.” (Matthew 26:33, NLT) We eat our own words with the bitter herbs of repentance. When we think of how we promised we would act, and how often in overt or subtle ways, we have denied our Lord, we may weep whole showers of grief.

Peter must have contemplated, at length, his denial of his Lord. The place in which he did it, the reasons that led him into such heinous sin, the lies and blasphemies he uttered, and the dreadful hardness of heart which drove him to do so again and yet again. How can we, when we are reminded of our misdeeds, and their exceeding sinfulness, remain indifferent and stubborn? Shouldn’t we repent of our sin, and cry to the Lord for renewed assurances of His pardoning love? May we never take a dry-eyed look at sin. Doing so threatens us on a dangerous and lonely path, with a tongue parched in the flames of hell.

But Peter must also have thought about his Master’s look of love. The Lord followed up the rooster’s warning voice with an cautioning look of sorrow, pity, and love. That glance was never out of Peter’s mind so long as he lived. It was far more effectual than ten thousand sermons would have been without the Holy Spirit. The regretful apostle would be sure to weep when he recollected the Savior’s full forgiveness, which restored him to his former place. (John 21:15-19)

To think that we have offended so kind and good a Lord is more than sufficient reason for being constant weepers, both out of sorrowful repentance and at the same time joyful, thankful forgiveness. Lord, smite our rocky hearts, and make the waters flow.

By Charles H Spurgeon
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2009.

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•  Forgiveness – Yourself and  Others

•  The Power of Forgiveness | by Dr. Henry Brandt

•  Salvation Explained


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“I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint.” Psalm 22:14


Did heaven or Earth ever witness a sadder spectacle? In soul and body, our Lord felt Himself to be weak as water poured out on the ground. Placing of the cross in its socket shook Him with great violence, strained all His ligaments, pained every nerve, and more or less dislocated His bones. Burdened with His own weight, the glorious sufferer felt the strain increasing every moment of those six long hours. His sense of faintness and general weakness were overpowering. As He began to lose consciousness, His physical body became a mass of misery and swooning sickness.

The prophet Daniel once saw a great vision, prophesying Jesus’ suffering hundreds of years later, which he describes like this: “So I was left alone, gazing at this great vision; I had no strength left, my face turned deathly pale and I was helpless.” (Daniel 10:8) The pain our greater Prophet Jesus felt must have been incomprehensibly more dire as He felt it throughout His own soul. To us, sensations such as our Lord endured would have been unbearable. In His case, though already wounded, and still felt the sword. He drained the cup and tasted every drop.

As we kneel before our now ascended Savior’s throne, let us remember the way He prepared it as a throne of grace for us. Let us in spirit drink of His cup, that we will be strengthened for our hour of distress whenever it comes. In His natural body every part suffered, and so must it be in the spiritual body of which we are all now a part. But just like how out of all His grief and suffering His body came through uninjured to glory and power, so too will His spiritual body of the church here on Earth come through all its hardships and pain without so much as a blemish.

Question: What was the result of Jesus’ pain and sacrifice?

By Charles Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2009.
Used by Permission

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•   Jesus’ Resurrection: Fact or Fiction?  Resurrection evidences made clear and simple.

•   Who’s Got the Body?   A short, documented examination of evidences for Jesus’ resurrection.  By Rusty Wright

•  Salvation Explained


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“May they sing of the ways of the LORD, for the glory of the LORD is great.” Psalm 138:5


The time when Christians begin to sing songs of praise to God is when they first lose their burdens at the foot of the cross. Not even the songs of the angels seem so sweet as the first song which gushes from the inmost soul of the forgiven child of God. John Bunyan describes such songs in his classic book “The Pilgrim’s Progress. Bunyan says when poor Pilgrim lost his burden at the cross, he leapt into the air, and went on his way singing “Blest Cross! Blest Sepulcher! Blest rather be The Man that there was put to shame for me!

Do you remember the day when your shackles fell off? Do you remember the place when Jesus met you, and said, “I have loved you with everlasting love. I have absorbed your transgressions; they will never be held against you again.” What a sweet season it is when Jesus takes away the pain of sin and replaces it with the joy of serving Him in spirit and truth!

When the Lord first pardoned my sin, I was so full of joy that I could scarcely refrain from dancing! I thought on my road home from where I’d been saved that I must tell the stones in the street the story of my salvation. My soul was so full of joy that I wanted to tell every snow-flake that was falling from heaven of the wonderful love of Jesus, who blotted out the sins of one of the chief of rebels against him … me.

But it is not only at the beginning of the Christian life that believers have reason sing. As long as we live we will discover new reasons to sing songs of praise to the Lord. Our experience of His constant loving kindness leads us to say, “I will extol the LORD at all times; his praise will always be on my lips.” (Psalm 34:1) See to it, friend, that you magnify the Lord this day, in songs of praise on your lips and through your life.

Questions: What is your favorite (or one of your favorite) Christian worship songs, and why? What does it say to you about God?

By Charles Spurgeon
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Some Thoughts on Worship

The Confession

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“Taste and see that the LORD is good; blessed is the man who takes refuge in him.” Psalm 34:8


Faith in scripture is described as being known through all the senses:

  • Faith is sight:Look unto me, and be ye saved.” (Isaiah 45:22, KJV)
  • Faith is hearing:  “Hear me, that your soul may live.”  (Isaiah 55:3)
  • Faith is smelling:  “All your robes are fragrant with myrrh and aloes and cassia.” (Psalm 45:8); “your name is like perfume poured out.” (Song of Solomon 1:3)
  • Faith is spiritual touch. “the woman came behind and touched the edge of Christ’s cloak (Luke 8:43-48) and likewise we handle the things of the good word of life.
  • Faith is equally the spirit’s taste. “How sweet are your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth.” (Psalm 119:103“I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man, says Jesus, and drink his blood, you have no life in you.” (John 6:53) This “taste” is faith in one of its highest qualities.

One of the first experiences of faith is hearing. We hear the voice of God, not with the outward ear alone, but with the inward ear. We hear it as God’s Word, and we believe it to be so; that is the  hearing” of faith.

Then our mind looks on the truth as it is presented to us. We understand it and perceive its meaning; that is the “seeing” of faith.

Next we discover its preciousness. We begin to admire it, and find how fragrant it is; that is faith in its  “smell.

Then we embrace the mercies which are prepared for us in Christ; that is faith in its “touch.”

Therefore what follows from all of these enjoyments? Peace, delight, communion – which are faith in its  taste.”

Any one of these paths to faith is saving. To hear Christ’s voice as the sure voice of God in the soul will save us. But true enjoyment is the aspect of faith where Christ, by holy taste, is received into us, and made, by inward and spiritual understanding of His sweetness and preciousness, to be the food of our souls. It is then we sit “under His shadow with great delight.” (Song of Solomon 2:3, KJV) and find His fruit sweet to our taste.

Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow up in your salvation, now that you have tasted that the Lord is good.”  1 Peter 2:2-3

Question: Which way of  “perceiving faith”  is most effective for you, and why?

By Charles H Spurgeon
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Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, published in “Mornings & Evenings,”


Further Reading

Jesus is Always There!

God is Holy….

•  Salvation Explained


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“How precious to me are your thoughts, O God! How vast is the sum of them!” Psalm 139:17


Divine omniscience (God’s all-knowingness) gives no comfort to the ungodly mind, but to the child of God it overflows with consolation. God is always thinking about us, never turns aside His mind from us, and always has us before His eyes. This is precisely what we want and need, because it would be dreadful to exist for a moment beyond the observation of our heavenly Father.

His thoughts are always tender, loving, wise, sensible, and far-reaching. They bring to us countless benefits, so it is a choice delight to remember them. The Lord always did think about His people, and so comes their election and the covenant of grace by which their salvation is secured. And He will always think about them, and this will result in their final perseverance by which they will be brought safely to their final rest.

In all our wanderings the watchful glance of the Eternal Watcher is always fixed on us, and we never roam beyond the Shepherd’s eye. In our sorrows He observes us incessantly, and no painful moment escapes Him. In our trials He perceives all our weariness, and writes in His book all the struggles of His faithful ones. These thoughts of the Lord encompass us in all our paths, and penetrate the innermost region of our being. Not a nerve or tissue, valve or vessel, of our bodily organization is uncared for. All the little ones of our world are in the thoughts of the great God.

Dear reader, is this precious to you? Then hold steadfastly to it. Never be led astray by those philosophic fools who preach about an impersonal God (deism) or talk of self-existent, self-governing matter (naturalism). The Lord lives and thinks about us, this is a truth far too precious for us to ever abandon. Catching the attention of an important person is valued so highly that those who have it counts their blessings. But if that is so, how much more valuable is it to be constantly in the thoughts of the King of kings! If the Lord’s thoughts are on me, all is well, and we may rejoice evermore.

Have you considered that you are constantly in God’s thoughts? Does this truth give you comfort and confidence?

by Charles H. Spurgeon
Used by Permission
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.

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Further Reading

•   God Listens to Us

•   God Demonstrates His Love

•  Salvation Explained


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“Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.”  Psalm 119:49


Whatever your specific need is, you will likely find a promise about it in the Bible.

Are you feeling wearied and weak because your life has been troubling and tiring? Here is the promise: “He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak.” (Isaiah 40:29) When you read such a promise, take it back to our great God who promised it, and ask Him to fulfill His own word.

Are you seeking after Christ, and yearning for closer relationship with Him? This promise shines like a star upon you: “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.” (Matthew 5:6) Take that promise to God’s throne continually. Do not plead anything else, but go to God over and over again, praying “Lord, You have said it, I humbly ask that You do as You have said.”

Are you distressed because of sin, and burdened with the heavy load of your wrongdoings? Listen to these words: “I, even I, am he who blots out your transgressions, for my own sake, and remembers your sins no more.” (Isaiah 43:25) You have no worth of your own to deserve God’s pardon, but plead His written promises and He will perform them.

Are you afraid that you won’t be able to persevere to the end? Do you fear that, after having thought yourself to be a child of God, you might instead be a ‘castaway’? Take this word of grace to God’s throne and plead it: “Though the mountains be shaken and the hills be removed, yet my unfailing love for you will not be shaken nor my covenant of peace be removed.” (Isaiah 54:10)

If you have lost the sweet sense of the Savior’s presence, and are seeking Him with a sorrowful heart, remember these promises: “Return to me, and I will return to you” (Malachi 3:7) and “For a brief moment I abandoned you, but with deep compassion I will bring you back.” (Isaiah 54:7) Rest your faith upon God’s own word, and whatever your fears or desires, look to God’s “Bank of Faith” in your Father’s written word, saying, “Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.

Question: Which of God’s promises that you just read resonated most powerfully with you, and why?

By Charles H Spurgeon
Used by Permission

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Further Reading

• Prayer and the Promises  #4 in the Prayer Series by Barbara Epp

Going Deeper with God

•  Salvation Explained


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