Category: <span>thoughts by Bill Strom</span>

The person without the Spirit does not accept the things that come from the Spirit of God but considers them foolishness, and cannot understand them because they are discerned only through the Spirit.”  1 Corinthians 2:14

Ever wonder how we are nudged by God’s Spirit?

I have wondered if the Holy Spirit resides in my thoughts, feelings, or body. I consider this a mystery, however it works.

An example of God’s mysteries is his commandment that we forgive one another. During Jesus’ public ministry he forgave people routinely — and his critics hated him for it. But Jesus told us to forgive our sister or brother not seven times, but seven times seventy (Matthew 18:21-21). Outrageous!

Jesus’ lavish offering of forgiveness, and his call to forgive, may not seem wise today. One reason might be our pride. Studies show that when we are proud — when we are “full of ourselves” rather than God’s Spirit — we are prone to not forgive others, nor accept forgiveness from others. We may think that forgiveness shows weakness, lets the perpetrator “off the hook” or approves of what they did. We may not offer forgiveness because we want the wrong-doer to suffer.

Yet the Spirit prompts us to do it. Forgiving others make more sense when we remember what God did for us. He forgave us even while we were still sinners, and that Jesus suffered and died to make God’s redemption complete. Theologian Louis B. Smedes said,

To forgive is to set a prisoner free and discover that the prisoner was you.”

Do you feel nudged to forgive people who have hurt you? Or do you want to nurse your ego by not forgiving?

Dear God, forgive me for my unwillingness to forgive! Forgive me for squelching your Spirit! You have forgiven me of so much, and have provided your Spirit to guide me in wise choices. Help me listen authentically to your voice, and to accept the things that are of you. Amen.

Consider this question: how forgiving are you? Do you think everyone should be forgiven? Talk it over with some other people today and see what their answer is in comparison to Jesus’ in Matthew 18.

By Dr. Bill Strom
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Further Reading

Understanding the Holy Spirit

•  Spiritual Oxygen: Are You Getting Enough?

•  Salvation Explained


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Hear my cry for mercy as I call to you for help, as I lift up my hands toward your Most Holy Place.” Psalm 28:2

How are you feeling as the world awakens from the pandemic? Are some days bright and light as you seize the opportunity to meet with long-separated loved ones? Me too. But what about other days? Personally, some days I slug along with blurred focus and little energy, wishing I felt happier and optimistic, but often feeling down and just plain blah.

Why so glum if things are looking better?

A key reason is because despite getting back to normal, we have lost much, and loss causes grief.

What did you lose during the pandemic? Many lost the effort and purpose of meaningful work. Most lost routines and habits that gave structure and benchmarks to each day. People also lost celebrating anniversaries and birthdays and weddings or gatherings to say goodbye to those who passed. So we became sad. We grieved.

According to medical staff at the Mayo Clinic, grief makes us “feel numb or empty, angry, or unable to feel joy or sadness.” Grief can also show up in physical issues such as insomnia, feeling tired, weakened muscles, and nightmares. For some people grief makes us want to socially withdraw.

In the Psalms, David often turns to God in times of loss, chaos, and remorse. He lifts his hands and cries out for mercy and God’s unfailing love. Doing so shows his posture of humility and God’s sufficiency.

How about you? What space has the pandemic left you in? One of anger or anxiety or regret or sadness? How can your life with God help bring healing and hope? Let us lean into God and his loving care as we grieve for what we have lost and are thankful for what we have, and especially for the future unfolding.

Dear God, this past season has been hard. We have lost many things never to be replaced or reclaimed. Yet you are plenty for us. I celebrate your sufficiency and gifts amidst this hardship, gifts such as friends, family, and church, and the brighter days to come. Thank you for showing mercy. I lift up my hands to you in praise and adoration.

Seize opportunities to turn your eyes upon Jesus, tell him how you feel, and worship and thank him for his compassionate presence.

By Bill Strom
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What are your expectations this Christmas? Can you let some go in order to make room for God’s holy one?


Nehemiah said, ‘Go and enjoy choice food and sweet drinks, and send some to those who have nothing prepared. This day is holy to our Lord. Do not grieve, for the joy of the Lord is your strength.’” Nehemiah 8:10

When I was twelve years old, Christmas let me down. I still believed that the holiday was about receiving, and that year my small pile of gifts didn’t stack up to expectations. I recall getting mopey and going to my room to lament. When my sister found me she asked what was wrong, and I put it simply, “I didn’t get cool stuff this year.”

As an adult it’s easy to fall into the same trap. I may not expect “cool stuff” for gifts, but I have great expectations nonetheless. I hope that my sons will be home on Christmas Eve and day, that we will cook a Butterball, and play games as a family. This year may be different as our grown sons make commitments to new friends far away who wish for their Christmas Day attention. Christmas traditions will change.

When Nehemiah had the book of Moses read to the people of Israel after years of being forgotten, the people began to grieve. Some had never heard the requirements of God’s law. But Nehemiah put it in perspective: You’ve heard the Word! This is a Holi-Day. Celebrate! Make awesome food for yourselves and give some of it away!

We sometimes say Christmas is a Holy Day, but personally I forget that too often amidst the tinsel, TV, toys and boys. I forget that genuine joy comes from celebrating Emmanuel, the Word putting on flesh so we could see, touch, and know Him.

Dear God, help me find peace and joy in my relationship with you, and thank you for sending Jesus to redeem us from our low expectations. Amen.

What are your expectations this Christmas? Can you let some go in order to make room for God’s holy one?

By Dr. Bill Strom
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Further Reading

•  The Christmas Story – the story of Jesus Birth

•  Marvelous Love – A Story of a Mother’s Love

•  Salvation Explained


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Do you find yourself withholding love or rewards from people because you don’t like them?


But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.Luke 5:44-45

In a recent television show, two mothers were comparing their parenting styles with their sons. The first, a cold, calculating psychiatrist said she raised her son in a ‘rewards-based manner,’ giving him praise only if he earned it.  The second said she ‘just loved her son unconditionally.’  The first son turned out to doubt his gifts, and he wondered if his accomplishments as a scientist amounted to anything; the latter son thought himself a wonderful person.

The episode reminded me of Jesus’ call to not only love, but to love unconditionally, to shine care and kindness on people we like and dislike, those who love us back and those who treat us unfairly or cruelly.  The same passage in Luke goes on to say “If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you greet only your own people, what are you doing more than others?  Do not even pagans do that?”  By contrast, God lets everyone enjoy the warmth of his sun, that life-giving, life-enabling source of energy and joy. It may not seem fair, but that’s how God works.

Do you find yourself withholding love or rewards from people because you don’t like them? Ever wonder what it might mean to shine your kindness on people who are your enemies?

Dear God, I can learn so much from Jesus’ teaching that you warm the backs of evil people and good folks alike. Help me love everyone too, even my enemies. Amen.

Make a list of your top three enemies. Do one thing today toward one of them that shows kindness.

By Dr. Bill Strom
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Further Reading

The Power of Forgiveness | by Dr. Henry Brandt

Harsh Judgments Can Kill One’s Spirit

•  Salvation Explained


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I cry aloud to the Lord, I lift up my voice to the Lord for mercy. I pour out my complaint before him; before him I tell my trouble.” Psalms 142:1

I love the Psalms because they are so genuine; you know how the Psalmists feel even if it’s ugly and seemingly hopeless.

Would you believe that the person who wrote Psalms 142:1 was described as the apple of God’s eye? Impressively handsome? A brave military leader? The next king of Israel? Yes, the writer was David as he hid in a fortified cave outside the city of Adullam. He was hiding there because reigning King Saul, enraged with jealousy and fear, was out to kill him.

If you recall, David had a few chances to kill Saul even as Saul hunted him down, but in each case David resisted, not wanting to harm God’s anointed ruler. David took the high road despite his opportunity to remove his nemesis. But this Psalm of his lets us know it wasn’t easy.

Have you been in similar situations? Are you convinced you are living for God the best you can but you still experience struggles? Perhaps it’s health issues, financial woes, or relational problems. Perhaps you feel like running to a cave to hide and scream out, “Lord, have mercy on me!” or “Why this Lord?”

Be assured that God hears your complaint. And be equally confident that God hopes for us to stick with his plan, to take the high road, to keep being faithful even when life throws us problems, injustices, and pain. Our issues are not evidence of his unfaithfulness; rather, they remind us that we need to rely on him faithfully to help us through, just as David did.

Are you crying from a cave just now? Will you trust God to sustain you amidst your challenges?

God, listen to my heart, for it cries out to You; keep me in Your hands as I struggle. Thank You for sustaining me as I choose the right path despite many tribulations. Amen.

By Dr. Bill Strom
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Further Reading

•   He Put a Song in My Heart
•   What Do You Want Jesus to Say When you Meet Him Face to Face?
•  Salvation Explained

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For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins.”  Matthew 6:14-15

Recently I watched a television show where characters Don and Russ were at an impasse. Don had kept a secret from Russ, which was hurtful. When Russ discovered the wrongdoing, Don came clean, confessed, and asked Russ to forgive him. Russ replied that there was no need for him to forgive, because their relationship was strong like brothers.

While there is something pleasing about shrugging off a friend’s misdeed, it is not good to withhold saying “I forgive you.” Especially when the person who has hurt you asks for forgiveness!

Why?

Forgiving the offender helps them heal.

Don may begin to wonder if he and Russ really are good. Such doubt is cancerous to friendship. However, hearing Russ say, “I forgive you for keeping that information from me” would be something Don could hang on to; it would be salve for his heart.

Also, forgiving the offender helps the forgiver heal.

If Russ expresses forgiveness to Don, he has said something audible that Don (and perhaps others) heard him say, and now Russ’s heart needs to line up with it. If he does not forgive, he may begin to harbour bitterness toward Don.

Research indicates that proud people are less likely to say they forgive others. Why? Because pride gets in the way. Forgiving requires humility to let go of the hurt the offender has caused.

No wonder God underlined the importance of forgiving one another. It shows a humble heart.

Dear God, Help me forgive friends and family who have wronged me. Help me forgive them by saying so in person. You have forgiven me of so much; help me imitate your humble, loving forgiveness.

Ask the Spirit to reveal to you any person who needs to hear you say you forgive them. Then do so, trusting that the Spirit of Christ is giving you the ability to do so.

By Bill Strom
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FURTHER READING

  The Gift of Forgiveness | by John William Smith
•  
Feelings, Forgiveness and Peace | by Dr. Muriel Larson
•  
The Power of Forgiveness | by Dr. Henry Brandt

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: https://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


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“Commit to the Lord whatever you do and he will establish your plans.” Proverb 16:3

In Whistle While You Work, Richard Leider and David Shapiro make the point that “calling” has traditionally been associated with God’s summoning of pastors or missionaries. We’ve likely heard such language as: “He was called to the ministry” or “she was called to missions.” When we adopt this way of thinking, we judge non-ministry work as second-class and less worthy.

But Leider and Shapiro suggest that calling is more inclusive than just to ministry; they believe calling is any inner tug or summoning to “give our gifts away.” We sense that bid for our heart when we’re doing what we do well and blessing others along the way.

What gifts do you love giving away? What activity brings you joy? Which of these joy-giving abilities do you value most?

Maybe your answer is serving people, working with technology, planning events, building things, performing music, or teaching others. God calls us to go for it as we love him and love others. As the proverb notes, when we commit our ways to Him, he will help us figure out the details.

Can you name a gift you passionately value? Are you willing to commit it to God? Doing so will help you discern your calling where you are right now.

Dear God, thank You for making sacred the work I do in Your name with the gifts You’ve given me to give away. Help me take stock of my gifts, passions, and values so I may discern how I may best invest my life loving You, people, and myself. May I know in my spirit Your summoning so I may joyfully give my gifts away. Amen.

By Bill Strom
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“Take special note of anyone who does not obey our instruction in this letter. Do not associate with them, in order that they may feel ashamed. Yet do not regard them as an enemy, but warn them as you would a fellow believer.”  2 Thessalonians 3:14-15

These last months, the world has become accustomed to the phrase “social distancing,” which means staying six feet apart, limiting interaction, and living in quarantine. Why? To avoid catching the corona virus.

Did you ever consider that the Bible refers to a similar practice for spiritual health? In 2 Thessalonians, Paul ended with the command that if anyone disobeyed these instructions, they were not to associate with them! Warn them!

In its full-blown form, this teaching, along with others, prompted the early church to develop the practice of dis-fellowshipping. Sounds unloving, right? Even judgmental. Why would God inspire Paul to write it?

Menno Simons, a church reformer, wrestled with this teaching and practice. Simons saw it this way. God called us to be holy [1 Peter 1:15- 16]:

But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: “Be holy, because I am and to live in the world but not like the world”.

So when believers chose to thumb their nose at God and gave Jesus a bad name, God made a plan for spiritual, social distancing.

But Simons understood that we are all sinners, so holding others accountable must be done with care

in sighing, tears, and a spirit of compassion”… in the love of Christ,” and done “not too rigidly or too leniently.”

May we seek God’s wisdom, walk with patience, and speak with courage when we admonish others, and may we do so in love for the good of one another. And if we receive such admonitions, may we wake up to God’s loving call to return to his ways.

Dear God, you care deeply for our spiritual well-being and detest sin. Help me understand how to graciously yet firmly approach brothers and sisters — in love — who appear insistent on spoiling your reputation. And may I humbly receive correction in the spirit of love so that I may know and love you more. Amen.

By Dr. Bill Strom
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FURTHER READING

  1. How to Fall in Love with Jesus by Sylvia Gunter
  2. The Christian and the Bible – Do you ever doubt the validity of the Bible?
  3. Can We Believe the Bible? By Max Lucado

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“The person without the Spirit does not accept the things that come from the Spirit of God but considers them foolishness, and cannot understand them because they are discerned only through the Spirit.” I Corinthians 2:14

Ever wonder how we are nudged by God’s Spirit? I have wondered if the Holy Spirit resides in my thoughts, feelings, or body. I consider this a mystery, however it works.

An example of God’s mysteries is his commandment that we forgive one another. During Jesus’ public ministry he forgave people routinely — and his critics hated him for it. But Jesus told us to forgive our sister or brother not seven times, but seven times seventy (Matthew 18:21-21). Outrageous!

Jesus’ lavish offering of forgiveness, and his call to forgive, may not seem wise today. One reason might be our pride. Studies show that when we are proud — when we are “full of ourselves” rather than God’s Spirit — we are prone to not forgive others, nor accept forgiveness from others. We may think that forgiveness shows weakness, lets the perpetrator “off the hook” or approves of what they did. We may not offer forgiveness because we want the wrong-doer to suffer.

Yet the Spirit prompts us to do it. Forgiving others make more sense when we remember what God did for us. He forgave us even while we were still sinners, and that Jesus suffered and died to make God’s redemption complete. Theologian Louis B. Smedes said, “To forgive is to set a prisoner free and discover that the prisoner was you.”

Do you feel nudged to forgive people who have hurt you? Or do you want to nurse your ego by not forgiving?

Dear God, forgive me for my unwillingness to forgive! Forgive me for squelching your Spirit! You have forgiven me of so much, and have provided your Spirit to guide me in wise choices. Help me listen authentically to your voice, and to accept the things that are of you. Amen.

By Dr. Bill Strom
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Let us hold unswervingly to the hope we profess, for he who promised is faithful. And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds, not giving up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching.” Hebrews 10:23-25

When we see Christmas scenes of Jesus’ birth, we observe a family of three: Mary, Joseph, and the infant in swaddling clothes. They appear like a nuclear family in the 21st century where mom and dad work and junior goes to daycare. Jesus was born first, but he wasn’t an only child.

I wish we had more insight into Jesus’ growing up as he welcomed his half-brothers James, Joseph, Simon, and Judas and at least three sisters (see Matthew 13:56). Did all the sons join father Joseph in the carpentry trade? Did his sisters marry early and bring brothers-in-law to the mix? How did siblings respond to Jesus’ messiah complex? We read in scripture it took a while for them to come around.

Why these questions at Christmas time? Because for me Christmas is about hope like that mentioned by the writer in Hebrews. And hope is best shared with family. This month our three sons will find their way to our home and we will eat, laugh, share, and encourage one another. And for any who struggle with health or relationships or vocations, we will find in the image of Jesus, the helpless babe so frail on straw, a source of strength. We know that He in us provides abundant potential for peace and purpose. Even amidst broken family.

Can you find hope in the story of Christ as child? In Jesus’ family? Or in your family as a mirror of His in its less-than-perfectness?

God, celebrating Christmas with family can be challenging at times, yet even in this experience may I find hope for myself, and bring encouragement to siblings and parents alike. Amen.

by Bill Strom
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The nations will see your vindication, and all kings your glory; you will be called by a new name that the mouth of the Lord will bestow . . . No longer will they call you Deserted, or name your land Desolate. But you will be called Hephzibah, and your land Beulah.” Isaiah 62:2,13

The saying, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me” could not be any more false. Actually, verbal abuse cuts to the core and wounds the spirit like piercing arrows.

On the other hand, a soothing tongue is a tree of life (Proverbs 15:4), and the tongue of the righteous are like silver (Proverbs 10:20). Yet more fundamental than affecting our feelings, the words people aim our way tell us whom and whose we are. Words shape identify.

God promised his people, Zion, a fresh identity through his words. Zion had drifted far from God, ignored his law, and allowed injustice to run rampant. Yet God said, “The Redeemer will come to Zion, to those in Jacob who repent of their sins, (Isaiah 60:20). After they did, God said that Israel’s neighbors would no longer label them “deserted” or “desolate,” but rather “my delight is in her” (Hephzibah) and “married” (Beulah), and that his words would draw them to himself.

Is the same true today for you and me? Dr. Neil Anderson of Freedom in Christ Ministries highlights terms that God promises us when we are found in him, terms such as:

  • Chosen
  • Redeemed
  • Complete
  • Free from condemnation
  • Inseparable from his love
  • His workmanship
  • His temple
  • A minister of his reconciliation.

The list goes on (see [https://ficm.org/about-us/#!/who-i-am-in-christ]).

Have you embraced those terms, and see yourself as God sees you, or do you shrug them off and say, “No, not me”?

Dear God, thank you that I am who you say I am. Help me ignore the labels that Satan and the world wish to impose on me. Draw my attention to your promise of freedom and joy when I walk with you, and may I know your love and redemption in my life as I agree with what you say of me. Amen.

By Dr. Bill Strom
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If anyone causes one of these little ones—those who believe in me—to stumble, it would be better for them if a large millstone were hung around their neck and they were thrown into the sea. If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life maimed than with two hands to go into hell, where the fire never goes out.” Mark 9:42-43

Jesus was speaking in these verses, and he didn’t mince words.

He was desperately concerned that bad people were causing young believers to lose faith. Many hurtful things cause new Christians to stumble — things such as being mocked, belittled, attacked, or humiliated. Or worse, being abused by fellow “Christians.” Jesus said it would be better if a large millstone — one so big it requires a donkey to turn it — was tied around the offender’s neck and he were tossed in where the sharks roam.

Then Jesus spoke to mature believers, challenging them to get rid of whatever steals their spiritual fervour, for heaven’s sake. If one’s hand causes one to steal, cut it off. If one’s foot causes you to walks into sin, cut it off. If one’s eye images evil, cut it out.

We might take all this as figurative way of speaking, but the warning is clear. The wrongful hand, foot, and eye may be graphic metaphors for any sin. If a practice undercuts our faith, takes us away from God, or causes us to stumble, it’s better to get rid of it than to risk God’s judgment — a perfect judgment that knows if we truly believe and have been transformed by him.

What causes you to stumble? What takes you away from God rather than drawing you closer to him? What makes you want to stop believing rather than rest in peaceful trust?

Praise God that he provides his Spirit to convict us of wrongdoing. May we rely on his leading so that we can live righteously in him.

Dear God, Jesus’ words are convicting here. I know you are full of grace, and that your blood covers my sin. But I also know who much you desire to free me from things that trip me up again and again. I confess my need for your grace, forgiveness and transforming power. Please help me to keep choosing you. Amen.

By Bill Strom
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But to Jonah this seemed very wrong, and he became angry. He prayed to the Lord, “Isn’t this what I said, Lord, when I was still at home? That is what I tried to forestall by fleeing to Tarshish.”  Jonah 4:1-2

Have you ever felt like God was too easy on sin? That he let people off the hook, so to speak?

Jonah felt this way. God had called him to sail to Nineveh — that bastion of Assyrian power and moral decadence. At first he refused to go because he feared that they would listen to his message, repent, and get right with God.

However, once he arrived in Nineveh, still smelling like fish (See Jonah 1:17-2:10), he obeyed God and walked around the city pronouncing His imminent wrath. “Forty more days and Nineveh will be overthrown,” he shouted. Those people repented.

Later, when this ground-swell revival reached the King’s palace, he too repented, and made it official: Let everyone, even animals, fast. Wear mundane clothes to show humility! Call on God and give up your evil and violent ways! ( Jonah 3: 7-9).

More people repented. And God noticed.

When God saw what they did and how they turned from their evil ways, he relented and did not bring on them the destruction he had threatened (Jonah 3:10).

And Jonah felt that all this was very wrong, and he got angry. Jonah complained that God did what God is known to do — show compassion to people desperately in need of him.

Where did Jonah go wrong? It seems he forgot that God is in the business of redeeming everyone to himself, no matter what we’ve done. He’s eager to show compassion to those who admit that they have messed up, including you and me.

Dear God, help me understand your unfailing compassion for the world, and for me too. I confess that I am as messed up as people around me, and am desperately in need of your redeeming love. Keep from me a smugness of heart that would hold back my own compassion for others. Amen.

By Dr. Bill Strom
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The Lord is slow to anger but great in power; the Lord will not leave the guilty unpunished. His way is in the whirlwind and the storm, and clouds are the dust of his feet. Nahum 1:3

Have you ever been bullied? Perhaps the tyrant called you names, or pushed you around, or took something that was yours. Bullies are often puffed-up people who think losers deserve to be hassled, and those who get bullied feel pain and humiliation.

The children of Israel felt this way toward their powerful Assyrian neighbors. The Assyrians had invaded Jewish territory, seized King Hoshea, and deported most of the nation into exile (2 Kings 17).

The prophet Nahum assured the Jews that God was still in control despite the whirlwind and storm. Nahum reminded them that God had great power — enough to fix the issue in an instant if he chose — but that he was being patient. He allowed the bullying to continue because King Hoshea had done evil in God’s eyes, and the Assyrians are helping God get Israel’s attention. This was difficult news, but God wanted his people to turn back toward him.

In addition, Nahum also declared that God will bring justice to everyone who is guilty — eventually — but, because of his loving kindness, he often withholds his judgment until later.

When we experience hardship, we might ask, “What is God teaching me here, and how may I, like him, be patient and merciful even toward my enemies?” For as Paul wrote, “…do you show contempt for the riches of his kindness, forbearance and patience, not realizing that God’s kindness is intended to lead you to repentance? (Romans 2:4).

Dear God, sometimes I wonder why my enemies seem to have the upper hand and beat me down. Help me see your purpose in affliction, and remember that you wait patiently for everyone to acknowledge your Lordship. May I show the same loving kindness toward my enemies in order that I may draw some to you. Amen.

By Bill Strom
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“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Jeremiah 29:11

In my work as a university professor I often write letters of reference for students who are applying for their first job out of college or for graduate school. Along with this service comes the role of counsellor to graduates as they hear from one organization or school, but not another.

Sometimes this feedback is about timing. In one case a student received a resounding “yes” from one graduate school, was offered a scholarship, and was invited to visit the campus to meet professors and check out the program. But a second school gave a “wait and see” response, did not offer a scholarship, and did not invite the student to visit.

Sometimes God makes his way clear, and when he does, we need to guard against demanding other answers or being given more options.

Jeremiah reminds us that God has plans for us, even prosperous ones. It’s too bad we second guess his clear signs as to which way to go. So often it is as simple as turning away from closed doors and walking through others flung wide open.

God, help me pay attention to clear signs you provide regarding my future. Help me see your ‘no’ as ‘no’ and your ‘yes’ as ‘yes’ that I may enter the doors you open for me. Amen.

Thought: Consider a decision you have to make. Are some options ‘green’ while others are ‘yellow’ or ‘red’? Follow the green option and keep trusting God.

By Dr. Bill Strom
Used by Permission

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