Category: <span>thoughts by Marilyn Ehle</span>


Growing in grace they shall still bring forth fruit in old age; they shall be full of sap (spiritual vitality) and rich in the verdure (abundance) of trust, love, and contentment. They are living memorials to show that the Lord is upright and faithful to His promises…” Psalm 92:14-15 (Adapted from the Amplified Bible)

She is now in her 90’s, resides in an assisted living facility, has a failing memory, and—some would say—is confined to a wheelchair. But when I saw her recently in the narthex of our church waiting for her son to take her home, I saw a woman with pink cheeks, surrounded by people who couldn’t wait to say hello. There was the mom of toddlers who heard Marti—when she was merely in her 80’s!—speak to young mothers about maintaining sexual happiness in marriage. An older woman wanted to bring Marti up to date on the Bible study she formerly attended. Someone else reported on her children’s missionary activities in a secure country; Marti has prayed for this couple since they were teenagers.

Many years ago I asked Marti how she “happened” to be so involved in ministry, especially since her beloved husband died in her arms while on a mission trip. The essence of her answer?

Oh, Marilyn, I just kept saying ‘yes’ to Jesus. There were times when I wasn’t sure about the path my husband or our organization was suggesting, but when I knelt by my bed, confessed my inadequacy (or angry resistance!), asked for wisdom, and reaffirmed my willingness to go anywhere, be anything, God always led in the right direction.

Simple, isn’t it? While Marti has lived with disappointments and sorrow, experiences rapidly failing health and is dependent on others, she sits in her wheelchair to pray, listen to others read the Bible to her and rejoices that a daughter and two sons carry on an inner city ministry to at-risk teens. Grandchildren minister in unexpected and unique ways around the world. There is no “I-wish-I-could” attitude in Marti. She just keeps saying “yes” to Jesus.

by Marilyn Ehle
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Never too Old – by Katherine Kehler

A Call to Prayer – to seniors and those who are housebound but have internet.

Never Too Old –  by M. Jantzen

thoughts by Marilyn Ehle Thoughts by Women


“Be ready to speak up and tell anyone who asks why you’re living the way you are, and always with the utmost courtesy.” 1 Peter 3:13 (The Message)


In a recent conversation with a successful businessman, he described how he encourages his Christian colleagues to live and work in a secular environment where a verbal expression of faith may not be welcome or even allowed. His advice, however, should not be limited to the nine-to-five, frequently harsh business world. How can we be “evangelists” in whatever community in which we find ourselves? This man says, “Live a life that invites inquiry.”

Am I living my faith in such a supernatural way that people are dazed by my reliance upon God?

Do my neighbors see unselfish acts quite out of character with the prevailing culture? Do I courteously relate to my family?

Paul and his friend Silas were privileged to hear that kind of question. They had been beaten and jailed for talking about Jesus but their response was nothing short of miraculous. Instead of whining or beating on the bars of their cell door, at midnight they were praying and “singing hymns to God.” Suddenly God intervened with an earthquake that shook open the prison doors. Perhaps it was both the earthquake and the mens obvious trust in God that elicited the jailer’s question: “What must I do to be saved, to really live?” (Acts 16:30, The Message)

When was the last time a friend asked, “What IS it with you? How can you keep going? Why do you seem content when your world is crumbling?” This is not to suggest that we hide our difficulties from onlookers, but what a thrill it is when we allow God to produce supernatural love, joy, peace and patience in the face of trial—responses that invite  inquiry.

Father God, grace me with the desire, willingness and ability to live a life that invites inquiry. Help me trust you to put the right words in my mouth at the right times.

When was the last time a friend asked you about your faith? What was your response?

Read 1 Peter 3:12-14 for encouragement.

By: Marilyn J. Ehle
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•  We are Christ’s Ambassadors

• Conversation Startersto transition to Spiritual things

Come Alongside – what it looks like to come alongside of people while Jesus draws them closer.

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So we do not look at what we can see right now, the troubles all around us, but we look forward to the joys in heaven which we have not yet seen. The troubles will soon be over, but the joys to come will last forever.” 2 Corinthians 4:18


I live in a city with over 200 days of sunshine each year. But along with warmth and beauty, such brightness also yields a negative effect. Extended exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays produces cataracts as well as more serious degenerative diseases. To counteract these possibilities, doctors advise the wearing of sunglasses.

But sunglasses have both positive and negative effects. Recently as I was driving I commented to my husband, “It looks as though the predicted rain will be heavier than expected. Look at those dark clouds.” Then I removed my sunglasses for a moment and was surprised to see that while clouds definitely were scudding across the sky, they weren’t as dark and threatening as I first thought.

It’s possible to wear spiritual sunglasses that distort our view of people and the world just as my glasses produced a less than accurate picture of the sky. God says, “Love your enemies,” but I see their violence and assume that the Father’s love couldn’t possibly extend to them and therefore, I have no responsibility to emulate that love. Jesus proves his power over wind and storm but I cower in the face of natural disasters and the vicissitudes of life. He proclaims victory over sin and death but I neglect or refuse to appropriate all that the Holy Spirit generously offers.

Physicians who specialize in eye care routinely recommend cataract surgery, an operation to remove a cloudy lens, replacing it with an artificial lens to restore clear vision. In a similar but far more restorative procedure, God waits for our consent for his operative work to help us see him, his creation and even ourselves with more perfect vision. His command to “fix our eyes on Jesus” can become a daily reality when we remove the sunglasses of our own distorted view and see God and his world with vision unfiltered by our own pessimism and faithlessness.

The psalmist prayed, “Open my eyes…” and the hymn writer penned, “Open my eyes, illumine me…” How different will be my viewpoint of the people and world around me when my prayer is the same.

By Marilyn Ehle
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“They (the psalmist’s enemies)…swarmed around me like bees, but they were consumed as quickly as burning thorns…I was pushed back and about to fall, but the Lord helped me. The Lord is my strength and my defense; He has become my salvation.” From Psalm 118


A friend* living in another country sent me this fascinating account of a recent experience:

Psalm 118 came to life Monday night after I had an unexpected encounter with a swarm of bees. I was at my computer and looked up to see bees flying in the window. I jumped up and waved the first non-breakable object I could find at them and got all but two bees to go back the way they came before slamming the window shut. Then my offensive weapon, a stuffed dog, became a bee smusher.

The sight on the other side of the glass was unlike anything I’d ever seen. Hundreds, possibly thousands of bees swarming about for hours. This morning, when I went outside, hundreds of dead bees lay by the elevator where they’d come in through a nearby window. Many of those bees would have been in my apartment if I hadn’t been close at hand when the cloud appeared.

The psalmist wrote that the enemy nations surrounded him like bees.

Now that I’ve come a bit closer than I’d like to being surrounded by bees, I have yet another picture of God’s protection.

As I reflected on what happened, I realized that the enemy had been attacking me with a lot of little things, none in themselves that big, but together were probably a bigger swarm than I’d realized. In Christ’s name I can slam the window shut on what the enemy is trying to do.

What are the “bees” in our lives?

Perhaps the potential sting looks like worry, or depression, or the biting words of one we had thought to be a friend. Taken singly we are apt to think that we can simply ignore the bees’ presence or combat them with positive thoughts, but our ultimate weapon is always reliance upon the Lord who promises to be our strength, defense and salvation.

*My friend has given me permission to write about this incident.

by Marilyn Ehle
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From Brokenness to Holiness – by Daniel Forster

• Authority Over the Enemy –  by Bill Bright

No Regrets  by Rand Kreycik

thoughts by Marilyn Ehle Thoughts by Women


I called to the Lord – in my distress I called to the Lord –  I cried to my God,  He heard my voice – He reached down – the Lord was my support He rescued me because he delighted in me.”  Read Psalm 18


Over here, Grandpa! Over here, Grandpa! Over here, Grandpa!”

The toddler’s piercing voice reverberated in the restaurant as she persistently called to her grandpa who stood seemingly unresponsive at the order counter. For what seemed like eons to those of us hoping for a quiet haven for morning coffee, the childish voice shrilled on. Finally ”to our immense relief” grandpa turned, smiled and said a quiet, “I see you.” Satisfied with this simple reply, the child quieted and settled into her padded seat.

This incident strikes home to parents traveling with small children, and is a vivid example of how God patiently waits for us to hear His quiet voice when we insistently cry out our needs. We shout “over here, Father” as though He doesn’t see our trembling bodies or hear our shrieking cries. And then, finally, His soothing words enter our beings and we can settle into whatever circumstances surround us: “I see you.”

The child simply needed to be reassured that her grandpa actually could see her even though he was engaged in other activity. When we call to the Lord ”when we cry out to Him” we can be confident of his support and His rescue. Because He delights in us.

I wonder how much energy I spend in shouting when all I need do is whisper?

Help me, Father, to settle into your love and delight.

by Marilyn Ehle
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How To Be Sure God Listens To Your Prayers

I Hear God’s Voice

• When You Speak, God Hears

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Are you tired? Worn out? Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me—watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly.Matthew 11:28-29


The computer is second only to the refrigerator on my Important Machine list. My demands are relatively simple in contrast to those of my husband’s technological requirements—those facilitating communication, finances, record keeping, Power Point© and much more. My needs center around don’t-lose-what-I-write and send-that-email.

Because I was a whiz in that archaic high school class called typing, my fingers fly over the keyboard. My mind whirls with not only the next thought I wish to appear on the screen but also with the paragraphs that lie ahead in my imagination.

More frequently than I like, just in the middle of what I’m sure will become famous words to live by, a number of documents and folders begin flashing across my screen in lightning-like fashion. It seems that everything I’ve ever stored is being reproduced, one atop another. Tech experts tell me this problem is often caused by my expecting too much from the machine in front of me. It is overload. I cannot proceed with the scheduled writing task until I hit the “force quit” button, my computer is turned off, given a rest and then restarted.

Perhaps you felt that during the recent days, both your brain and body were in overload. Although you enjoyed being with family and you even had moments of beautiful worship in your church, there came the time when the tree needed to be undressed of its finery. the pine needles vacuumed, dust removed from the shelves that once held carved creche sets, and the bills paid. It is time to “force quit.”

I love the way Eugene Peterson paraphrases Jesus’ words: “Come to me…get away with me…walk with me…work with me…watch how I do it…keep company with me…” When thoughts and activities and even people are flashing across my life like lightning, it’s time to take the simple action Jesus prescribes and thus “learn to live freely and lightly.

by Marilyn Ehle
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Tiredness –  by Terry Stead

• 6 Verses for When You Feel Stuck –  by Laura Rath

Dealing with Despair – by Mike Woodard

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Seek the Lord while he may be found; call on him while he is near.”  Isaiah 55:6

…those who seek me diligently find me.”  Proverbs 8:17

…seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness.”  Matthew 6:33

Seek isn’t a word that slips easily into our English vocabulary. We don’t seek a bargain; we shop for one. Rarely do we seek for misplaced keys; we look for them. But this fascinating word is used, in one form or another, over 240 times in the Bible and it has a meaning we should seriously consider. Dr. Skip Moen defines the word as deliberately striving for and desiring something as an act of the will, putting your whole life at the disposal of God’s rule and will so that nothing takes greater priority.

Do I desperately seek after God or do my attempts wither when He seems distant, not answering my prayers, when I don’t feel His presence? What would it look like to stay in my quiet corner seeking after God with the same determination as the persistent widow in the story Jesus told? And then there is Jacob wrestling with the angel of God: “I will not let you go unless you bless me.” Both the woman and Jacob put their whole lives at the disposal of God so that nothing took greater priority.

I want these words from ‘A Guide to Prayer’ to be mine each morning:

Lord, you have promised to meet those who seek your face. Come now and reveal your presence to me as I make myself present to you.”

Father, it’s much easier to just skim through a few Bible verses each morning, content with doing what seems part of the “formula” for following you. Don’t let me be so easily satisfied; help me pant after you as a deer pants for water.

by Marilyn Ehle
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Seeking God’s Face

• Yes I Will – A Devotional by Doug Lim

FIRST PLACE – by Karen Huffaker

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thoughts by Marilyn Ehle Thoughts by Women

With eyes wide open to the mercies of God, I beg you, my brothers (and sisters), as an act of intelligent worship, to give him your bodies, as a living sacrifice, consecrated to him and acceptable by him.” Romans 12:1-2 (J.B. Phillips Translation)

Nestled in the foothills of majestic mountains, the building with its glass-paned roof was an architectural wonder. But now it is wrapped in a protective shell as construction crews remove the roof which leaked when wind whipped through the area and heavy rain or snow fell. Soon new glass with metal supports will allow visitors to again view the snowy clouds against the blue sky.

Investigation proved that several of the metal supports which would have prevented much of the damage were misaligned, some by as little as 5/8 inch (approximately 1 ½ centimeters). Such a small space to cause near irreparable damage.

How often do we ignore the “small sins” that seem to be of minimal importance? Surely exaggerating the truth or whining or harboring a critical attitude can’t be that bad? Too often if these aren’t recognized and confessed, they lead to a deeper and more consistent pattern of self-seeking or complacency.

This does not mean that we scrape around our every action or attitude to see whether or not it is sin! A man once said that he found the Holy Spirit quite capable of revealing sin, and therefore thanked God for such revelation. The next blessed, holy and cleansing act was simply to agree with God (i.e., confession) about the sin and praise Him for forgiveness. If the man was unsure about the action or attitude and God did not reveal it as sin, he simply walked on in the freedom of forgiveness.

A misalignment of less than an inch is costing millions of dollars for repair. God who loves us asks that we give him our bodies—our buildings—as holy sacrifices so the world can clearly see Him through us.

By Marilyn Ehle
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Further Reading

• Aphids and Sin – a comparison

Pluck It or Bag It – Lessons on Sin from Cilantro

Dirty Oven – comparing Sin to a Dirty Oven


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You have refreshed the hearts of the Lord’s people… refresh my heart in Christ… Come away and be refreshed… Come to me, all you who are weary and carrying heavy burdens, and I will refresh you… (From the New Testament: Philemon, Matthew, Mark)


Hungry tourists are drawn to small kiosks because of a sign overhead: REFRESHMENT STAND. Perhaps they’re weary from hiking or hot from sun on the beach, or maybe just seeking diversion, but the food and drinks offered seem to call for immediate consumption. Unfortunately, most items on the menu—while tasty on the tongue—offer only temporary satisfaction and it isn’t long before customer’s line up for just one more ice cream cone or one more tangy drink.

The Apostle Paul wrote that his friend, Philemon, had refreshed Paul’s heart as well as the hearts of many others. Jesus told his friends that if they came away to a quiet place they would be refreshed, and He promises to refresh all those weighed down by the burdens of life. The word used means to cause to soothe or to calm and while Jesus offers it, it is also a gift we can give to each other.

I meet regularly with two friends who offer this gift. Neither is my mentor or guide or counselor…just friends. (Or perhaps they are all that as friends??) Time flies as I sit with one over coffee, sometimes relating family experiences, or sharing how recent time with Jesus has been uplifting. (Or convicting!) Another friend and I meet weekly for prayer. Our “prayer” frequently consists of conversation with each other and with our Father as we invite Him into the hour. Sometimes we weep for and over God’s people; other times our praise rings loud; often we plead for a new work of God’s Spirit. And I come away from both experiences, with two very different friends, refreshed…calmed, soothed, given rest. Refreshment that lasts.

Gentle Savior, thank you for not only offering refreshment from yourself, but allowing us the privilege of sharing it with each other. Help me be alert for those around me who need the words and actions that calm and soothe.

By Marilyn Ehle
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Stop for a Moment 

• Come to the Waters

Living Water for the Thirsty

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“faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for. Hebrews 11:1-2


Many people know the hymn, “Tis So Sweet to Trust in Jesus.” The melody soothes, the words bring hope. But like many familiar pieces of verse, Louisa Stead’s words can easily slip like quicksilver off our lips without lodging in our hearts and minds.

We may be tempted to think that Louisa wrote the words while gazing at a beautiful sunset with a light breeze rippling through her hair. In fact, however, it was while living in a culture far from her own and after experiencing deep sorrow that the poem was written.  She had planned to be a missionary in China but hopes were dashed when her health failed. Later her husband drowned in a tragic accident after a picnic on the beach. Shortly after the death of her husband, Louisa took their young daughter and moved to the African continent where she served as a missionary, later remarrying, raising her daughter, and faithfully ministering to others.

Easily overlooked in the familiar poetry is one line: “I’m so glad I learned to trust you, precious Jesus, Savior, Friend.” Louise learned to trust God not through the easy spaces of life, but through the dark nights when all seemed bleak and dark. Many of us plaintively cry out for more faith but too often we want that faith handed to us without going through the process that God chooses.

Giants of the faith” known in history and lauded in scripture are those who deeply believed God even when they could not see His love or plan. In spite of pain and discouragement, Louise Stead could end her hymn with the words, “And I know that you are with me, will be with me to the end.”

Father, your promise to be with me gives so much comfort, but I confess that I too often want that presence without any pain. Teach me more about your love and help me trust you in all circumstances.

By Marilyn Ehle
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Further Reading

The Trust Factor
The Only Totally Fair Judge!
Salvation Explained

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As you come to him, “you, like living stones, are being built into a spiritual house.” 1 Peter 2:5


Stones of all shapes and size have been used for centuries in the building process. Traveling through the heather-covered rolling hills of Scotland, one sees mile after mile of low stone fences. A family in Pennsylvania scoured nearby fields for rocks to form a massive fireplace in their new home.

For rocks and stones to fulfill a specific purpose – whether fence or fireplace – they must fit together. A fence builder may fill gaps with smaller pieces of rock while the mason will chip off rough or protruding edges and use cement to construct a sturdy wall.

The 17th century monk, Brother Lawrence, wrote, “Sometimes I consider myself as a stone before a carver as he prepares to make a statue. Presenting myself thus before God, I desire him to form his perfect image in my soul and make me entirely like himself.”

God is in the business of forming each of us – each of his living stones – into the perfect form that will build an edifice that brings glory to him and displays his love to the world. I often don’t like the chipping away process, but I need to understand and submit for his greater glory.

Lord, thank you that you form each of us according to a beautiful master plan. You make no mistakes and will not give up on your goal to use each one of in the building of a spiritual house. Help me see glimpses of that house as I submit to your love.

by Marilyn Ehle
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•   God is Creator, We the Created

•  The Beauty of Character 

•   His Masterpiece

 

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“I have hidden your word in my heart.”.. “Open my eyes that I may see wonderful things in your law.”  Psalm 119:11 and 18


She is a wife and mother, busy with the details involved in maintaining a family and household. Outside the walls of her home she works in her church and community. Life can be overwhelming even for the most organized and Holy Spirit-filled woman.

In the middle of one such busy day her eyes fall on the Bible she first began studying while in college. The pages are fragile, loose and tattered, the binding broken. She stops for a moment, fingers drifting over that much-loved book, eyes lighting on the many underlined verses.

A feeling of overwhelming gratitude settles over her as she recalls how her grandmother sent this book so she could learn how to know, love and trust the God of the Bible. Many years have passed, many other Bibles sit on her library shelves, but this one is special. Chores and cares slip away as she silently thanks God for this broken, precious book that brought “and continues to bring” new life.

Your Book, Father, is much more than a mere book. Thank you for how it has been preserved through the ages and for the light and life it brings.

by Marilyn Ehle
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What’s that Smell? – by Kristi Huseby

• How Great is our God – by Charles Spurgeon

The Beginning of Wisdom by Suzanne Benner

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…if you believe, you will see the glory of God. John 11:40


Jesus hears Martha’s heartbreaking words as she leans into him: “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.” How he perhaps wipes her tears while reminding her of the hope she has clung to in the past: “Your brother will rise again.” Finally, after Jesus supports her hope with resurrection truth, she whispers, “Yes, Lord, I believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, who was to come into the world.”

Have you experienced moments when God personally comforted you in times of sorrow or doubt or weariness? You settled into his love with enough faith to walk the path ahead? You found unbelievable strength to keep on keeping on?

Mourning crowds rush toward the tomb, Mary and Martha cling to each other as a weeping Jesus goes to the grave of his friend. The Martha who moments ago expressed her faith in words that echo down through the ages, now says, “But Lord… By this time there is a bad odor for he has been there four days.” From a strong faith she returns to the reality of death.

We understand Martha’s strong faith/small faith all too well. We have seen God work miracles in our lives and in the lives of those we hold dear. We whisper our own statements of faith, but when “reality” hits, we falter. Just a bit.

When Jesus told the bystanders to remove Lazarus’ binding grave clothes, I wonder if some of Martha’s small faith wrappings also fell off? She will need her growing faith in the days ahead as she sees her precious Jesus betrayed, beaten, crucified. But I think that even in tears her steps were a little stronger, her thinking a little clearer as she recalled the faith expanding action of her Savior when the glory of God was revealed at the resurrection.

Oh dear Father, I cry out with the words of a father desperate for his son’s healing, “I do believe! Help me overcome my unbelief” (Mark 9:24).

By Marilyn Ehle
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•  The Walk of Obedience – by Mary Pinckney

•  Blessed Obedience – by Idelette McVicker

•  God Requires Risky Obedience – by Jon Walker

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“Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever…” Hebrews 13:8


An announcement seen in religious magazine:

Wanted: pastor for small church; mostly older people
but willing to reach out to younger people; no desire for change
in worship or preaching style.

Do you catch the incongruity in that advertisement? The basic premise is “we want to follow Jesus but we want to do it our way.” We have a startling example of that in the followers of Jesus. When He began to reveal to His disciples that soon He would go through an unimaginable ordeal of suffering and death, Peter—who only moments before had given a strong statement of faith—freely offered his opinion. Peter took Him by the hand and led Him aside and then facing Him began to rebuke Him  (Mark 8:32 Amplified Bible). In essence Peter said,

Jesus, I’m sure you have the program all wrong. I know you’re the Messiah and have a great plan for saving the world, but what you’ve just described is too radical.”

Another time after Jesus preached a sermon in one of his favorite synagogues about the reality of discipleship, the Bible records, When His disciples heard this, many of them said, “This is a hard and difficult and strange saying… Who can be expected to listen to such teaching?”… After this, many of His disciples returned to their old associations and no longer accompanied Him.

Following hard after Jesus is committing to a life where change is the norm and not the exception. And in that change we find joy in the presence of Jesus.

by Marilyn Ehle
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How Big is God?

•  Wisdom and Knowledge of God

God, our Shield

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All who have experienced soul-ripping grief at the death of a loved one would agree that time seems to stop.

Nights are endless, days drag like boulders pulled by a plow. Saying goodbye produces its own unutterable pain, but the days between death and funeral and burial—though perhaps filled with practical details—seem hours longer than the actual twenty-four. Although we may dread the more public acts of farewell, there is the incongruous something within us that cries to “just get it over with.”

Could this be similar to why we joyfully anticipate the glory of Easter Sunday but do our best to ignore—or at the very least de-emphasize—the emotionally-draining events of Holy Week? To shop for colorful spring clothing is far more satisfying than symbolically wrapping a rough towel around our waists to humbly serve others as Jesus did at the washing of feet.  What joy in preparation for a sumptuous Easter Sunday family reunion meal while how meager—and heart-rending—to contemplate the meaning of the bread, wine and bitter herbs that Jesus and his friends ate just before going out to the Mount of Olives. Triumphant is the music of “Christ, the Lord, Is Risen Today.” Somber are the notes of Braham’s Requiem.

New clothes, good food with friends and family and uplifting music are all rightful celebrations of the resurrection, what the Apostle Paul preaches as the bedrock of our faith. But I wonder how much more meaningful would be our Easter joy if we first took the time and concerted effort to walk thoughtfully through Jesus’ last days, if we asked God to let us more deeply glimpse his agony of relinquishment in Gethsemane, if we wept over his human cry, “I am thirsty.”

Many churches of a more liturgical nature practice what is known as the Easter Vigil where individuals gather in the darkness of Saturday night to read scripture and contemplate the sadness that surrounded Jesus’ followers after his death and burial, a darkness that represents all the meanings of darkness: hidden and secret sins, the darkness of the world and of our hearts. At a point soon after midnight, one candle is lit to symbolize Christ’s resurrection and members of the congregation light their own small candles from the larger one. Those who have participated in such a service of remem-brance and celebration relate how their view of Easter has been forever changed.

While this may not be practical or possible for all, let me encourage you to not avoid the pain of walking with Jesus through the days between Palm Sunday and Easter. I assure you that the sunrise of Easter will never be more glorious!

by Marilyn Ehle
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More Easter Reading:

Who’s Got the Body?   A short, documented examination of evidences for Jesus’ resurrection.  By Rusty Wright

The Power of Resurrection – by William S. Stoddard

Touched by the Risen Lord by Elfrieda Nikkel

Jesus has Forgiven you, but Have you forgiven Yourself ?

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thoughts by Marilyn Ehle Thoughts by Women