Category: <span>thoughts by Francis Frangipane</span>

devotional on ponderingAs Christians, we spend too much time battling basic, elementary battles: “Am I truly saved?” “Am I really forgiven?” The fact is, God has so much more for us. He seeks to conform our thought-life to the actual thought-life of Christ. Indeed, the Holy Spirit comes not just to give us goose bumps and chills but to restructure our attitudes and perceptions until we think the thoughts of Jesus.

Consider Paul’s remarkable insights. He wrote,
But a natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; and he cannot understand them, because they are spiritually appraised. But he who is spiritual appraises all things, yet he himself is appraised by no one. For who has known the mind of the Lord, that he will instruct Him? But we have the mind of Christ
(1 Corinthians 2:14-16). This revelation is stunning: we have the mind of Christ. God wants us to have Christ’s very discernment.

Or consider again what Paul wrote to the Galatians. He said, “My children, with whom I am again in labor until Christ is formed in you” (Galatians 4:19).

Critics will call the revelation of Christ in us a heresy, as though all we were to have was the name but not the nature of Jesus Christ.

You see, God’s goal is not only to see us saved and go to Heaven but for Christ to be functionally formed and living through us on earth. We are not just to have a religion about what Jesus did; we are called to possess the very substance of who Jesus is.

Yes, it means we indeed will go to Heaven; but it is more. Through our knowledge of Christ’s word and our yieldedness to the Holy Spirit, the actual person of Jesus Christ, the Redeemer, gains living access to the needs of man. As His body, we give Him flesh and blood contact with this world. True, we face conflicts, but these difficulties are staged by God so He can showcase His Son through us. Indeed, we face persecution, but it’s only so Christ, in the midst of injustice, will reveal how His life overcomes death.

Again, Paul wrote,
For we who live are constantly being delivered over to death for Jesus’ sake, that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh” (2 Corinthians 4:11).

Isn’t this exactly what you desire, the “life of Jesus . . . manifested in [your] mortal flesh“? Aren’t you tired of the cycle of judging people, and then, because of pride, being judged by God in return?

What does it mean to have the mind of Christ? Does that mean we walk on the water or do great signs? Miracles are indeed a part of Christ’s life, yet there is something greater than miracles to attain: our hearts can be filled with the redemptive, creative thought-life of God! (See 1 Corinthians 2.)

Lord, deliver us of our fleshly motives! Free us from our human instincts and fallen passions. Grant us, Lord, the motives of Jesus. Teach us to think, not as a prosecutor whose quest is to condemn, but as the Savior whose heart is to redeem.

By Francis Frangipane

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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

true-foundation

Christ Himself is the eternal blueprint for our lives. Only in studying Him, in measuring ourselves by Him, do we grow securely upon the foundation of God.

Beloved, we were created to become like Christ. God’s plan has not faded or become obsolete! Even as Christ has not changed, so neither has the plan of God for the church. Our transformation will burn in God’s heart “until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a mature man, to the measure of the stature which belongs to the fullness of Christ
(Ephesians 4:13).

You see, the focus of both leadership and congregations should be upon attaining Christlike transformation and His love for people. This has been the Father’s purpose from the beginning of time and it remains His unchanging goal at the end of the age. (See Genesis. 1:26-27 and Romans 8:29.)

The problem is that, too often, as Christians we define ourselves by what we do for God rather than what we become to Him. What pleases the Father most is not what proceeds from our hands but what rises from our hearts. He is seeking the revelation of His Son in us. There is nothing on earth that so pleases the Father’s heart as when Jesus Christ is revealed through us. As Paul wrote, we become a “fragrance of Christ to God
(2 Corinthians 2:15).

This is why we focus on revealing Christ Himself. Other aspects of Christianity develop correctly only as they emerge out of our greater pursuit of Christlikeness. You see? No aspect of our spirituality functions properly apart from our living union with Christ. It is here, in pursuing Christlikeness, that we find true spiritual assurance that we are not being led astray.

Consider: Paul said that the result of seeking the measure of the stature that belongs to the fullness of Christ is that “we are no longer to be children, tossed here and there by waves and carried about by every wind of doctrine” (Ephesians 4).

Paul warned that people can be “carried about by every wind of doctrine.” Yes, false doctrines are dangerous, but Paul wasn’t limiting his warning only to false teachings. For even a true doctrine can have a false emphasis and lead us astray. The pursuit of Christlikeness aligns us with the Father’s highest priority for our lives. It secures us upon the path to truth, for “truth is in Jesus” (Ephesians 4:21). He Himself is the way, the truth and the life.

As a result, Paul wrote that intimacy with Christ was the deepest cry of his heart. He said, “That I may know Him and the power of His resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death” (Philippians 3:10).

He was not speaking of some esoteric knowledge of Christ but an intimacy that led to conformity. Do we see this? He wrote, “That I may know Him . . . being conformed.” Knowing Christ and being conformed to Him is of the same essence. Christ Himself is the true foundation upon which we must build our lives.

By Francis Frangipane

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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

devotional

Today too many Christians have lost their hunger for God. Instead of coming into the Lord’s presence hungry for more of His fullness, our thoughts are held hostage to worldly pursuits and fleshly distractions. At best we are merely curious about spiritual realities, but not truly hungry.

Let me tell you a story that illustrates what I mean. We have a little dog named Sophie. Sophie loves people food. To her, eating people food is the culinary equivalent of entering the Kingdom of God. She loves our food. She even has a Bible verse that she claims in faith, “Even the dogs get the crumbs” (Matthew 15:27).

When my wife and I share a meal, Sophie will sit at our feet, squint her eyes, and stare at us (she thinks squinting makes her cuter). Any food that falls to the floor instantly vanishes into her mouth. No matter how much of her food she has already eaten, she is always hungry for ours.

Our home has a small, fenced-in yard outside our porch where Sophie plays. Although the fence surrounds the area, there are gaps where the pickets don’t quite reach to the ground. If Sophie wanted, she actually could squeeze under the fence and get out, but she normally has no reason to try.

Occasionally she will get curious and go as far as the gate, stand there a while and look out, but she doesn’t leave the yard.

One day, though, my wife decided to feed a few slices of stale bread to the birds that nest on the other side of the fence. When Sophie went out an hour later, she immediately noticed a human food smell in the air, which she tracked to the bread outside the gate. In less than a heartbeat she found a little gap under the picket fence, flattened herself to the ground, and then shimmied beneath the fence to the bread on the other side. It was gone in less than a minute.

My point is this: hunger will take you where mere curiosity would never go.

My friend, God is looking for hungry people. Blessed are those who hunger. He is seeking people who are truly seeking Him. Indeed, He has bread from Heaven for us, and it is eternally satisfying. We cannot afford to settle into the routine of a fenced-in reality, not when God has eternal food prepared for us. Let us, therefore, follow our hunger as we pursue the presence of God.

By Francis Frangipane

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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

devotional on prayer

Then Moses returned to the Lord, and said, “Alas, this people has committed a great sin, and they have made a god of gold for themselves. But now, if Thou wilt, forgive their sin—and if not, please blot me out from Thy book which Thou hast written!” Exodus 32:31-32

The prayer of Moses is remarkable. Moses was not only the leader of Israel, he was an intercessor as well. Ultimately, an intercessor gives up all personal advantage for the sake of those for whom he prays. Moses knew he personally had favor with God. Yet he presented himself as a remarkable portrait of one irreversibly committed to Israel’s transformation. He said, “If Thou wilt, forgive their sin—and if not, please blot me out from Thy book.”

Moses said, in effect, that he was not serving for individual gain or glory – this was not about him, but about the people he loved and served, rebellious as they were. The soul of Moses was bound together with the future of Israel. Similarly, we must see ourselves irreversibly bound together with the lives of those we pray for, both family and friends, as well as our community and nation. Moses would not be blessed, honored or pleased apart from the fulfillment of God’s promise to the Hebrews. If God would not forgive them, He could not have Moses either. Israel and Moses had become a package deal.

Have you struggled with situations in your personal life in which you cannot seem to break through? Perhaps you are spending too much time on your needs and not enough time praying for others. Make a prayer list of people with desperate needs, and as you intercede for them, see if the Holy Spirit doesn’t break through for you, too. Indeed, include your enemies and those who have hurt you. Remember the story of Job. When he prayed for his friends, God healed him (see Job 42:10). Intercession not only transforms the world, but also transforms us.

Lord Jesus, I am awed at Your willingness to show mercy. You actually changed Your mind about judgment on sinners because of one man, Moses. Lord, in my world and times, let me be that one who so delights You, who is so intimate with You, that my prayer for mercy outweighs Your judgment to destroy the disobedient. May the favor You have given to me be multiplied to those who yet do not know You, and may it spread until all the earth is filled with Your glory!

By Francis Frangipane

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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

by Francis Frangipane

Typically when I remind Christians that their core destiny is Christlikeness, most nod, affirming the general truthfulness of my statement. However, I can tell that they really do not believe becoming Christlike is the reason they exist. If they did, they would have a plan. They would be in obvious pursuit of their transformation.

Yet, when people think of their destiny, they often first think of something they will do for God, a task that involves the visible demonstration of a unique gift or ministry function. But neither our gifts nor a specific calling represent the core reality of our destiny. It is not what we do for the Lord, but what we become to Him that matters. It is this inner surrender of the heart, this deliberate turning of our soul Godward, that defines our true progress.

Our responsibilities and gifts may be as varied as the seasons of our lives – and certainly we should spend time attending to them. But I am speaking of the deeper reality that must develop within us: becoming like Christ.

I am sixty-six years old. During my life I have served God in a variety of tasks. Yet whether I was church planting or selling computers, doing odd jobs or starting a training school, I never confused my calling with my destiny. Becoming like Jesus is why we exist.

Your Life Focus

The sad fact is, we have seen ministry leaders whose gifts and callings were so powerful, so captivating, that they seemed capable of bringing Heaven itself to earth. Then, to our shock, we discovered later that these very same individuals were secretly in the grip of the most disgraceful sins. How could such things occur? When our primary goal is the development of our gifts or calling rather than our character, we become increasingly vulnerable to satanic deception.

You see, a time will come when in increasing degrees we begin to master our gifts. We learn how to preach and prophesy effectively; we can minister in perfect pitch in song or praise. We even master the tears of sincerity in our altar calls and ministry. Outwardly our spirituality is convincing, yet inwardly our soul is bored with our staged, religious performance. The challenge of our calling is gone. No one discerns our inner decline, not even our closest friends. In that state of mind, a door swings open to the world of the flesh. Scripture says, “Desire fulfilled is a tree of life” (Proverbs13:12).

The life that sustains us – that should ultimately fill us – is not drawn from seeking our calling but seeking the Caller Himself. This was Paul’s goal when he passionately wrote, “That I may know Him.” This “being conformed to His death” was the “one thing” Paul said he truly focused on (Philippians 3:10, 13). Paul lived a transcendent life that unfolded “from glory to glory” (2 Corinthians 3:18).

Beloved, God created man to be “in the image and likeness of God” (Genesis 1:27 AMP). The image of God is Christ, and it is our conformity to Christ that fulfills the purpose of our existence. We do not need crowds to see us perform nor applause to affirm our ministry. When we pursue the image of Christ, we possess the meaning of life.

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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

by Francis Frangipane

daily devotionsA religion without love is an abomination to God. The church needs to learn that God desires love and compassion, not merely an adherence to ritual and sacrifice. Thus, Jesus said His Father’s house would be a “house of prayer for all the nations” (Mark 11:17). True prayer is born of love and comes in the midst of sin and need. It comes not to condemn, but to cover.

All nations sin. All cultures have seasons of moral decline and spiritual malaise. Yet these periods can become turning points if, in times of distress, intercessors cry to God for mercy. Thus, Christlike prayer brings redemption out of disaster.

The church is created not to fulfill God’s wrath, but to complete His mercy. Remember, we are called to be a “house of prayer for all…nations.” Consider passionately this phrase: prayer for.” Jesus taught His disciples to “pray for” those who would persecute or mistreat them (Matthew5:44). When Job “prayed for” his friends, God fully restored him (Job 42:10). We are to “pray for the peace of Jerusalem” (Psalm 122:6), and “pray for” each other so that we may be healed (James 5:16). Paul wrote that God desires all men to be saved (1Timothy 2:4). Therefore, he urged “that entreaties and prayers…be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority” (v. 1-2).

But,” you argue, “my country (or city) is a modern manifestation of ancient Babylon.”

I don’t think so. But even if it were, when the Lord exiled Israel to Babylon, He didn’t order His people to judge and criticize their new cities. Rather, He commanded, “Seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you…and pray to the Lord on its behalf; for in its welfare you will have welfare” (Jeremiah 29:7). Time after time the scriptural command is to pray for, not against; to pray mercifully, not vindictively. God’s call is for prayer moved by compassion, not condemnation. Indeed, at its very essence, the nature of intercession is to appeal to God for forgiveness, and then redemption, to come to sinful people.

We have studied what is wrong with our society and can prove, with charts and surveys, the trends of iniquity, yet we have failed to appreciate the influence of the intercessions of Christ. We consider ourselves experts on the nature and cause of sin, but deny the nature and cause of Christ, which is redemption. My friends, being informed by the news media is in no way the same thing as being transformed into the nature of the Savior.

The media sees what is wrong with the world and exposes it; Christ saw what was wrong and died for it. Study Isaiah 53. It reveals in wondrous detail the Savior’s nature: Christ numbered Himself with the sinners (v. 12). He interceded for the transgressors (v. 12). He is “with us” and “for us” (Matthew 1:23; Romans 8:31), even when He is speaking to us of our iniquity.

God does not want us to be judgmental; He wants us prayer-mental. As instinctively as we have judged people, we should pray for them instead.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2012/06/29/ff_prayer-mental-not-judgmental/
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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

by Francis Frangipane

If Satan cannot distract you with worldliness, He will overwhelm you with weariness. Indeed, how easy it is to wear ourselves out; even good works done without recharging ourselves in God can drain us of life and energy. Daniel speaks of a time at the end of the age when the enemy will attempt to “wear down the saints of the Highest One” (Daniel 7:25). God never intended for us to do His will without His presence. The power to accomplish God’s purpose comes from prayer and intimacy with Christ. It is here, closed in with God, where we find an ever-replenishing flow of spiritual virtue.
Weary in Well-Doing

In the early 1970s, during the beginning of my ministry, the Lord called me to consecrate to Him the time from dawn until noon. I spent these hours in prayer, worship, and the study of His Word. I would often worship God for hours, writing songs to Him that came from this wonderful sanctuary of love. The presence of the Lord was my delight, and I know my time with Him was not only well spent but also well pleasing to us both.

However, as my life began to bear the fruit of Christ’s influence, the Holy Spirit brought people to me for ministry. In time, as more people came, I found myself cutting off forty-five minutes from the end of my devotional time. On occasion, ministry to people extended into the night, and I stopped rising as early as I had.

Church growth problems began to eat at the quality of my remaining time; ministerial expansion, training younger ministries, and more counseling and deliverance crowded the already limited time I had left. Of course, these changes did not happen overnight, but the months and years of increasing “success” were steadily eroding my devotional life. In time I found myself in a growing ministry but with a shrinking anointing to sustain it.

One day an intercessor called who prayed regularly for me. He told me that during the night the Lord spoke to him in a dream concerning me. I was eager to hear what the Lord had revealed to my friend, thinking perhaps He was going to increase our outreach or maybe supply some needed finances. I asked him to tell me the dream.

What the Lord said had nothing directly to do with the projects and priorities that were consuming my time. He simply said, “Tell Francis I miss him.”

Oh, what burdens we carry — what weariness accumulates — when we neglect the privilege of daily spending time with Jesus. I cried as I repented before the Lord, and I readjusted my priorities. No longer would I counsel people in the mornings. I would spend this time again with God.

I was sure I would lose some of the people who had recently joined the church. These were people who had come specifically for personal ministry. I knew I would not have the same time for them as before, but I had to make my decision for God.

The next Sunday morning I announced to the congregation that my mornings were off limits, consecrated to God. “Please,” I said, “no calls or counseling. I need to spend time with the Lord.” What happened next shocked me. The entire church rose and applauded! They wanted a leader who spent more time with God! They were tired of a tired pastor.

As we enter the coming days, our primary activity will be to minister to Christ. Certainly there will be increased pressures. There will also be times of great harvest and spiritual activity. No matter what circumstances surround us, we must position ourselves first and continually in the presence of God. For to miss our time with Jesus is to miss His glory in the day of His presence.

Father, it is the fragrance of Jesus, cultivated in secret, that manifests through us the knowledge of Him in every place. Forgive me for being anxious and troubled about many things, when to sit at Your feet was the only necessary thing. I choose now that better part, and gratefully receive from Your intimacy the better things which shall never be taken away.

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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

by Francis Frangipane

It has been my experience that too many of us, as Christians, have been confused about love. We have assumed that attaining the look of love was the same reality as actually being transformed into a loving person.  I’m not saying that we have consciously planned on being shallow or noncommittal, but that somehow we have settled on the cosmetic instead of the real.

We have developed an “altar” ego, a look for church that lasts, at best, just a few minutes longer than the church service itself.  All we have really accomplished is to perfect the art of acting like Christians.

I think we have yet to learn to consistently walk according to the standards of Christ’s love.  I hear how quick some are to speak about the flaws of those they supposedly love, and I wonder, what kind of love demeans an individual behind their back?  When I witness unloving words from a Christian’s mouth, I am reminded that we have much to learn about Jesus and what it means to follow Him.

David prayed, “Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my rock and my Redeemer” (Psalm 19:14).

Our words are the by-product of our meditations.  Whatever is brooding in our hearts will eventually ascend to our lips.  If we have unforgiveness prowling within, our conversations will be barbed with negative comments; even in moments of light-hearted banter, if we are harboring bitterness, it will slice through our speech.  Jesus taught that ‘the mouth speaks out of that which fills the heart” (Matthew 12:34).  We cannot fix our words without first fixing our hearts.

When the Lord judges us for our words, it is because He is seeking to purify our hearts.  True, the heart is deceitful above all things and it is difficult to know our own iniquity.  Yet if we simply pause and listen to how many of our words are without love, we can track them back to the real problem: loveless hearts.

A New Anointing
Christians are in the fire of God.  The Holy Spirit is purging the church from negative chatter.  A fresh anointing is at hand where God’s people shall speak with the character necessary to represent Him.  What the Lord told the prophet Jeremiah He is speaking also to us:

therefore, thus says the LORD, “If you return, then I will restore you — before Me you will stand; and if you extract the precious from the worthless, You will become My spokesman”” (Jeremiah 15:19).

Let us pray that as God exposes our lack of love and a time will soon come when we will pray with credibility: “You have tried my heart; You have visited me by night; You have tested me and You find nothing; I have purposed that my mouth will not transgress” (Psalm 17:3).

Do we see this? God judges the quality of our entire lives by the soundness and substance of our words.  Thus Jesus warned, “But I tell you that every careless word that people speak, they shall give an accounting for it in the day of judgment” (Matthew 12:36). Let us consider Christ’s warning soberly.  He continued, “For by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned” (Matthew 12:37).  James adds, “Judgment will be merciless to him who has shown no mercy; mercy triumphs over judgment” (James 2:13).  I have a holy fear in my heart concerning these warnings.  I know that if I am merciless toward others, God will be merciless toward me.

Character Counts
Sometimes I think we try to mask our critical attitude by calling it “discernment.”  The fact is, most of what manifests in our discussions about others is simply judging after the flesh.  If we truly love an individual, we will be as loving in their absence as we are in their presence.

Jesus said His disciples would be known by their love. Paul said that the love of Christ is supposed to control us, which means it is the nature and discipline of love that keeps us from joining in verbal attacks or even subtle criticisms. You see, it takes character to avoid being sucked into gossip and criticisms.  There is a high road we can take.  It starts with prayer, it extends to grace, it is slow to speak, it approaches an individual with a meek heart, it talks privately with the person;  it is forgiving when wronged and patient with the spiritually immature.

Of course, if someone is involved with criminal activity or seriously endangering others through their sin, we must love the greater community and take steps to protect the innocent. There is a time to discipline or even publicly expose sin (Matthew 18:15-17), but it’s after we exhaust other means of correction — and even then, our motive should communicate our hope of redemption and not allow our disclosure to become a smokescreen for revenge.  In all things, love must guide our words.

Child’s Eye-View of Love
Recently my youngest daughter, Eden, sent me a list of quotes that came from little children. Each child was asked to describe what love meant to them. Their answers were, at times, quite intriguing.  One in particular, from a four year old boy named Billy, has stuck with me. He said, “When someone loves you, the way they say your name is different. You just know that your name is safe in their mouth.

That thought seems to say it all: “When someone loves you . . . your name is safe in their mouth.”  Behold this clarity of vision as love is defined by a little child.  When we truly walk in Christ’s love, those around us will be safe — and others will see the love of Christ that controls us.

Beloved, to walk in covering love is to show ourselves truly acquainted with Christ.  Let us ask God, “Father, show me my heart.  Is Your love ruling, even in the unseen areas of my life? Are the names of others safe in my mouth?”

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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men

By Francis Frangipane

Ultimately, I believe there are only two acceptable, core attitudes we should have toward the Almighty.
The first attitude is heartfelt abandonment. This is the result of having found the Lord’s Presence in a new unfolding of His glory. Heartfelt abandonment will always be accompanied by transcendent awe, unspeakable joy and irrepressible love. All of these are the result of having laid hold of the Lord; they are the consequences of His presence.

The second core attitude we must possess comes in the seeming absence of God’s presence. It is a relentless longing, an unquenchable thirst, to find Him whom your soul loves. Abandonment and longing are the two tracks that lead us into our destiny in God and guides into true spiritual fulfillment.

The deception we battle about seeking God is rooted in the fact that, like ancient Israel in Babylon, we have lived too long in exile from our inheritance. In our apostatized condition we have legitimized superficiality and allowed shallowness to become our acceptable norm. Thus, the call is issued from heaven: Return to your dwelling place in God! For the Promised Land of the church is the dwelling place of God’s Living Presence.

You say, according to 2 Chronicles 7:14, “But we have humbled ourselves and prayed; we are turning from our wicked ways. Why has He not healed our land?” He has not heard our prayer because we desire our healing more than we desire our God. You see, there is yet one more imperative 2 Chronicles calls us to fulfill. In the context of repentance and prayer, He said, “…and seek My face.”

Beloved, when the Lord called David to seek His face, David responded, “Thy face, O God, I shall seek” (Psalms 27). This is the essence of one who has “a heart after God.” We seek God for His heart, not merely His hand. We have asked Him to extend His hand, to touch and heal us. But the Lord, in His great love for us, desires we seek His face.

Thus, the Holy Spirit bids us to draw near to God. His word promises that, as we draw near to Him, He will Himself draw near to us. It is the nearness of His Spirit which descends upon us and, through us, heals our land.

Again the Lord speaks, “I will go away and return to My place until they acknowledge their guilt and seek My face; in their affliction they will earnestly seek Me” (Hosea 5:15).

Together, using the very words provided us by Hosea as our template, the Lord even gives us words with which we respond, “Come, let us return to the Lord. For He has torn us, but he will heal us; He has wounded us, but He will bandage us. He will revive us after two days; He will raise us up on the third day that we may live before Him” (Hosea 5:16).

Yes, even the prophet Hosea encourages us with his words as well, “So let us know, let us press on to know the Lord. His going forth is as certain as the dawn; and He will come to us like the rain, like the spring rain watering the earth” (Hosea 5:15-6:4).

Is this not the very cry of your heart, that the living presence of God would saturate the dryness of your soul? Come to us, O Lord, like the rain watering the earth!

Therefore we conclude, it is time to seek God. We urge every pastor to guide their church and every parent to lead their family into an attitude of seeking God. Consecrate a room in your church or home and call it the “tent of meeting.” It is right, beloved, and timely, to seek after God.

Moses used to take the tent and pitch it outside the camp, a good distance from the camp, and he called it the tent of meeting. And it came about that everyone who sought the Lord would go out to the tent of meeting which was outside the camp“(Exodus 33:7). Everyone who sought the Lord entered the tent of meeting. Dear friends, the Holy Spirit shall help us. For the mission of the Spirit is, summarily, to lead us into the presence of Jesus. And this He will do until Christ is as real to us as the world was when we were sinners.

THE PROMISE OF GOD
Is it possible that we can be delivered of a superficial life? Yes. For the Spirit He has given us, dwells within us and He “searches all things, even the depths of God” (1 Corinthians 2:10).

If you are weary of a life without God’s fullness, then seeking the Lord may be a turning point in your walk with Him. Our hope rests in the integrity of His immutable word: “Then you will call upon Me and come and pray to Me, and I will listen to you. And you will seek Me and find Me, when you search for Me with all your heart. And I will be found by you” (Jeremiah 29:12-14a).

Let us pray:
Lord Jesus, my soul yearns and even longs for Your courts. Guide me into Your holy Presence, dear Lord. Let me find You again in a new way. I cannot live without Your constant love. I am desperate for You Jesus. Restore my longing for You until I find You, and in finding You, abandon myself totally into Your love. Amen.

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https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2010/07/18/ff_return-to-your-dwelling-place/
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Thoughts by All thoughts by Francis Frangipane Thoughts by Men