Category: <span>thoughts by Max Lucado</span>

by Max Lucado
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When we come to Christ, God not only forgives us, he also adopts us. Through a dramatic series of events, we go from condemned orphans with no hope to adopted children with no fear. Here is how it happens. You come before the judgment seat of God full of rebellion and mistakes. Because of his justice he cannot dismiss your sin, but because of his love he cannot dismiss you. So, in an act which stunned the heavens, he punished himself on the cross for your sins. God’s justice and love are equally honored. And you, God’s creation, are forgiven. But the story doesn’t end with God’s forgiveness.

“For you have not received a spirit of slavery leading to fear again, but you have received a spirit of adoption as sons by which we cry out “Abba! Father!” The Spirit himself bears witness with our Spirit that we are children of God.â€? (Romans 8:15–16, NASB).

But when the fullness of time came, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law, in order that He might redeem those who were under the Law, that we might receive the adoption as sons “(Galatians 4:4–5, NASB).

It would be enough if God just cleansed your name, but he does more. He gives you his name. It would be enough if God just set you free, but he does more. He takes you home. He takes you home to the Great House of God.

Adoptive parents understand this more than anyone. I certainly don’t mean to offend any biological parents – I’m one myself. We biological parents know well the earnest longing to have a child. But in many cases our cribs were filled easily. We decided to have a child and a child came. In fact, sometimes the child came with no decision. I’ve heard of unplanned pregnancies, but I’ve never heard of an unplanned adoption.

That’s why adoptive parents understand God’s passion to adopt us. They know what it means to feel an empty space inside. They know what it means to hunt, to set out on a mission, and take responsibility for a child with a spotted past and a dubious future. If anybody understands God’s ardor for his children, it’s someone who has rescued an orphan from despair, for that is what God has done for us.

God has adopted you. God sought you, found you, signed the papers and took you home.

Question: How does God show you that you are part of His adopted family?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/10/23/ml_adoption/

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Max Lucado
From: The Great House of God
Copyright (W Publishing Group, 1997)
Used by permission

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by Max Lucado
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“I will be with you always.� Matthew 28:20

David, the man after God’s own heart, said: “I’m asking Yahweh for one thing, only one thing: to live with him in his house my whole life long” Psalms 27:4 (MSG).

HomeWhat is this house of God which David seeks? Is David describing a physical structure? Does he long for a building with four walls and a door through which he can enter but never exit? No. “Our Lord does not live in temples built by human hands” (Acts 17:24). When David says, “I will live in the house of the LORD forever” (Psalms. 23:6), he’s not saying he wants to get away from people. He’s saying that he yearns to be in God’s presence, wherever he is.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
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Max Lucado
From: The Great House of God
Copyright (Word Publishing. , 1997)
Used by permission

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by Max Lucado
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“Lord, if it’s you,â€? Peter says, “tell me to come to you on the water.â€? Matthew 14:28 (NIV)

Peter is not testing Jesus; he is pleading with Jesus. Stepping onto a stormy sea is not a move of logic; it is a move of desperation. Peter grabs the edge of the boat. Throws out a leg… follows with the other. Several steps are taken. It’s as if an invisible ridge of rocks runs beneath his feet. At the end of the ridge is the glowing face of a never-say-die friend.

We do the same, don’t we? We come to Christ in an hour of deep need. We abandon the boat of good works. We realize… that human strength won’t save us. So we look to God in desperation. We realize… that all the good works in the world are puny when laid before the Perfect One.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/10/01/ml_look/

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Max Lucado
From: In the Eye of the Storm
Copyright (Word Publishing, 1991)
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by Max Lucado
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“Where can I flee from your presence? If I go up to the heavens, you are there; if I make my bed in the depths, you are there.� Psalm 139:7-8 (NIV)

Our asking “Where is God?” is like a fish asking “Where is water?” or
a bird asking “Where is air?” God is everywhere!

Equally present in Peking and Peoria. As active in the lives of Icelanders as in the lives of Texans.

We cannot find a place where God is not.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/09/29/ml_where/

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Max Lucado
From: Everyday Blessings
Copyright (J. Countryman, 2004)
Used by permission

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by Max Lucado
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“The LORD created the heavens.  He is the God who formed the earth and made it.”  Isaiah 45:18 (NCV)

You don’t need what Dorothy found. Remember her discovery in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz? She and her trio followed the yellow-brick road only to discover that the wizard was a wimp!  Nothing but smoke and mirrors and tin-drum thunder.  Is that the kind of god you need?

You don’t need to carry the burden of a lesser god…a god on a shelf, a god in a box, or a god in a bottle.  No, you need a God who can place 100 billion stars in our galaxy and 100 billion galaxies in the universe.  You need a God who can shape two fists of flesh into 75 to 100 billion nerve cells, each with as many as 10,000 connections to other nerve cells, place it in a skull, and call it a brain.

And you need a God who, while so mind-numbingly mighty, can come in the soft of the night and touch you with the tenderness of an April snow.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/09/23/ml_you-need/

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Max Lucado
From: Traveling Light
Copyright (W Publishing Group, 2000)

Used by permission
To learn more about Max Lucado visit his website at:
http://www.maxlucado.com/about/

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by Max Lucado
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“He chose us in Him before the foundations of the world.�
Ephesians 1:4 (NKJV)

Search the faces of the Cap Haitian orphanage for Carinette…The girl with the long nose and bushy hair and a handful of photos…The photos bear the images of her future family. She’s been adopted.

Her adoptive parents are friends of mine. They brought her pictures, a teddy bear, granola bars, and cookies. Carinette shared the goodies and asked the director to guard her bear, but she keeps the pictures. They remind her of her home-to-be. Within a month, two at the most, she’ll be there. She knows the day is coming….Any day now her father will appear. He came once to claim her. He’ll come again to carry her home. Till then she lives with a heart headed home.

Shouldn’t we all? Our Father paid us a visit too. Have we not been claimed? Adopted?… God searched you out. Before you knew you needed adopting, he’d already filed the papers and selected the wallpaper for your room.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/09/20/ml_chose-us/

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Max Lucado
From: Come Thirsty
©2000 – 2007
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by Max Lucado
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We are God’s workers, working together.
1 Corinthians 3:9 (NCV)

It’s a wonderful day indeed when we stop working for God and begin working with God….

For years I viewed God as a compassionate CEO and my role as a loyal sales representative. He had his office, and I had my territory. I could contact him as much as I wanted. He was always a phone or fax away. He encouraged me, rallied behind me, and supported me, but he didn’t go with me. At least I didn’t think he did. Then I read 2 Corinthians 6:1: We are “God’s fellow workers” (NIV).

Fellow workers?  Co-laborers?  God and I work together? Imagine the paradigm shift this truth creates. Rather than report to God, we work with God. Rather than check in with him and then leave, we check in with him and then follow. We are always in the presence of God…. There is never a nonsacred moment!

You can comment on this devotional online at:
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Max Lucado
From: Just Like Jesus
Copyright (Word Publishing, 1998)

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by Max Lucado
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David sang this lament over Saul and his son Jonathan, and gave orders that everyone in Judah learn it by heart.”
2 Samuel 1:17-18, The Message

David called the nation to mourning. He rendered weeping a public policy. He refused to gloss over or soft-pedal death. He faced it, fought it, challenged it. But he didn’t deny it. As his son Solomon explained, “There is…a time to mourn” (Ecclesiastes 3:1,4).

Give yourself some. Face your grief with tears, time, and ‘one more’ face your grief with truth. Paul urged the Thessalonians to grieve, but he didn’t want the Christians to “carry on over them like people who have nothing to look forward to, as if the grave were the last word.” (1 Thesselonians 4:13 The Message).

God has the last word on death. And, if you listen, he will tell you the truth about your loved ones. They’ve been dismissed from the hospital called Earth. You and I still roam the halls, smell the medicines, and eat green beans and Jell-O off plastic trays. They, meanwhile, enjoy picnics, inhale springtime, and run through knee-high flowers. You miss them like crazy, but can you deny the truth? They have no pain, doubt, or struggle. They really are happier in heaven.

And won’t you see them soon? Life blisters by at mach speed. “You have made my days a mere hand breadth; the span of my years is as nothing before you. Each man’s life is but a breath” (Psalm 39:5).

When you drop your kids off at school, do you weep as though you’ll never see them again? When you drop your spouse at the store and park the car, do you bid a final forever farewell? No. When you say, “I’ll see you soon,” you mean it. When you stand in the cemetery and stare down at the soft, freshly turned earth and promise, “I’ll see you soon,” you speak the truth. Reunion is a splinter of an eternal moment away.

So go ahead, face your grief. Give yourself time. Permit yourself tears. God understands. He knows the sorrow of a grave. He buried his son. But he also knows the joy of resurrection. And, by his power, you will too.

Question: Why is it so often so difficult in our culture to face our grief, not as God’s confident sons and daughters, but “like the rest of men, who have no hope“? (1 Thessalonians 4:13)

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/09/11/ml_grief/

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Max Lucado
From: Facing Your Giants
© (W Publishing Group, 2006)

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by Max Lucado
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“We have here only five loaves and two fish.� Matthew 14:17

How do you suppose Jesus felt about the basket inventory? Any chance he might have wanted them to include the rest of the possibilities? Involve all the options? Do you think he was hoping someone might count to eight?

“Well, let’s see. We have five loaves, two fish…and Jesus!� Jesus Christ. The same Jesus who told us:

Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. (Luke 11:19 NIV)

If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be given you. (John 15:7 NIV)

What ever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. (Mark 11:24 NIV)

Standing next to the disciples was the solution to their problems…but they didn’t go to him. They stopped their count at seven and worried.

What about you? Are you counting to seven, or to eight?

Here are eight worry stoppers to expand your tally:

Pray, first. “Casting the whole of your care [all your anxieties, all your worries, all your concerns, once and for all] on Him…(I Peter 5:7 AMP)

Easy now. Slow down. “Rest in the Lord, and wait patiently for Him
(Psalms 37:7).

Act on it. The moment a concern surfaces, deal with it. Don’t dwell on it. Head off worries before they get the best of you. Be a doer, not a stewer.

Compile a worry list. Over a period of days record your anxious thoughts. Then review them. How many of them turned into a reality?

Evaluate your worry categories. Detect recurring areas of preoccupation that may become obsessions. Pray specifically about them.

Focus on today. God meets daily needs daily. He will give you what you need when it is needed.

Unleash a worry army. Share your feelings with a few loved ones. Ask them to pray with and for you.

Let God be enough. “Your heavenly Father already knows all your needs. Seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and he will give you everything you need.� (Matthew 6:32-33 NLT).

Eight steps. Pray, first. Easy, now. Act on it. Compile a worry list. Evaluate your worry categories. Focus on today. Unleash a worry army. Let God be enough.
P-E-A-C-E-F-U-L

You can comment on this devotional online at:
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Max Lucado
From: Fearless
© (Thomas Nelson, 2009),

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by Max Lucado
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But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.2 Peter 3:18 (NIV)

Growth is the goal of the Christian. Maturity is mandatory. If a child ceased to develop, the parent would be concerned, right?…

When a Christian stops growing, help is needed. If you are the same Christian you were a few months ago, be careful. You might be wise to get a checkup. Not on your body, but on your heart. Not a physical, but a spiritual.

May I suggest one?…

Why don’t you check your habits?… Make these four habits regular activities and see what happens.

First, the habit of prayer…. Second, the habit of study…. Third, the habit of giving…. And last of all, the habit of fellowship.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/08/19/ml_habit/

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Max Lucado
From: When God Whispers Your Name
Copyright (Word Publishing, 1994)

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by Max Lucado
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With success comes a problem. Just ask Nadab, Elah, and Omri. Or interview Ahab, Ahaziah, or Jehoram. Ask these men to describe the problem of success. I would, you might be thinking, if I knew who they were. My point, exactly. These are men we should know. They were kings of Israel. They ascended to the throne…but something about the throne brought them down. Their legacies are stained with blood spilling and idol worship. They failed at success. They forgot both the source and purpose of their success.

You won’t be offered a throne, but you might be offered a corner office, a scholarship, an award, a new contract, a pay raise. You won’t be given a kingdom to oversee, but you might be given a home or employees or students or money or resources. You will, to one degree or another, succeed.

And when you do, you might be tempted to forget who helped you do so. Success sabotages the memories of the successful. Kings of the mountain forget who carried them up the trail.

The man who begged for help in medical school ten years ago is too busy to worship today. Back when the family struggled to make ends meet, they leaned on God for daily bread. Now that there is an extra car in the garage and a jingle in the pocket, they haven’t spoken to him in a while. In the early days of the church, the founding members spent hours in prayer. Today the church is large, well attended, well funded. Who needs to pray?

Success begets amnesia. Doesn’t have to, however. God offers spiritual ginseng to help your memory. His prescription is simply, “Know the purpose of success.� Why did God help you succeed? So you can make him known.

Why are you good at what you do? For your comfort? For your retirement? For your self-esteem? No. Deem these as bonuses, not as the reason. Why are you good at what you do? For God’s sake. Your success is not about what you do. It’s all about him—his present and future glory.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/08/17/ml_success/

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Max Lucado
From: It’s Not About Me
© (Thomas Nelson, 2007)
Used by permission

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by Max Lucado
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Our faces, then, are not covered. We all show the Lord’s glory, and we are being changed to be like him.”
2 Corinthians 3:18 (NCV)

The purpose of worship is to change the face of the worshiper. That is exactly what happened to Christ on the mountain. Jesus’ appearance was changed: “His face became bright like the sun” (Matthew 17:2).

The connection between the face and worship is more than coincidental. Our face is the most public part of our bodies, covered less than any other area. It is also the most recognizable part of our bodies. We don’t fill a school annual with photos of people’s feet but rather with photos of faces. God desires to take our faces, this exposed and memorable part of our bodies, and use them to reflect his goodness.

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/08/07/ml_reflecting/

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Max Lucado
From: Just Like Jesus
Copyright (Word Publishing, 1998)
Used by permission
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by Max Lucado
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Those who pray keep alive the watch fires of faith. For the most part we don’t even know their names. Such is the case of someone who prayed on a day long ago. His name is not important. He is important not because of who he was, but because of what he did.

He went to Jesus on behalf of a friend. His friend was sick, and Jesus could help, and someone needed to go to Jesus, so someone went. Others cared for the sick man in other ways. Some brought food; others provided treatment; still others comforted the family. Each role was crucial. Each person was helpful, but no one was more vital than the one who went to Jesus.

John writes: “So Mary and Martha sent someone to tell Jesus, “Lord, the one you love is sick’” (John 11:3, emphasis mine).

Someone carried the request. Someone walked the trail. Someone went to Jesus on behalf of Lazarus. And because someone went, Jesus responded.

In the economy of heaven, the prayers of saints are a valued commodity. John the apostle would agree. He wrote the story of Lazarus and was careful to show the sequence: The healing began when the request was made.

The phrase the friend of Lazarus used is worth noting. When he told Jesus of the illness, he said, “The one you love is sick.” The power of the prayer, in other words, does not depend on the one who makes the prayer but on the one who hears the prayer.

We can and must repeat the phrase in manifold ways. “The one you love is tired, sad, hungry, lonely, fearful, depressed.” The words of the prayer vary, but the response never changes. The Savior hears the prayer. He silences heaven so he won’t miss a word. The Master heard the request. Jesus stopped whatever he was doing and took note of the man’s words. This anonymous courier was heard by God.

John’s message is critical. You can talk to God because God listens. Your voice matters in heaven. He takes you very seriously. When you enter his presence, the attendants turn to you to hear your voice. No need to fear that you will be ignored. Even if you stammer or stumble, even if what you have to say impresses no one, it impresses God and he listens.

Intently. Carefully. The prayers are honored as precious jewels. Purified and empowered, the words rise in a delightful fragrance to our Lord. “The smoke from the incense went up from the angel’s hand to God
(Revelations 8:4). Incredible. Your words do not stop until they reach the very throne of God.

One call and heaven’s fleet appears. Your prayer on earth activates God’s power in heaven.

You are the someone of God’s kingdom. Your prayers move God to change the world. You may not understand the mystery of prayer. You don’t need to. But this much is clear: Actions in heaven begin when someone prays on earth. What an amazing thought!

When you speak, Jesus hears.

And when Jesus hears, the world is changed.

All because someone prayed.

Question: What would you like to tell God today that you haven’t said lately, or ever?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/07/30/ml_god-hears

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Max Lucado
From: For These Tough Times
Copyright (Thomas Nelson Publishers, 2006) Max Lucado
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by Max Lucado
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Holiday travel. It isn’t easy. Then why do we do it? Why cram the trunks and endure the airports? You know the answer. We love to be with the ones we love.

The four-year-old running up the sidewalk into the arms of Grandpa.

The cup of coffee with Mom before the rest of the house awakes.

That moment when, for a moment, everyone is quiet as we hold hands around the table and thank God for family and friends and pumpkin pie.

We love to be with the ones we love.

May I remind you? So does God. He loves to be with the ones he loves. How else do you explain what he did? Between him and us there was a distance – a great span. And he couldn’t bear it. He couldn’t stand it. So he did something about it.

Before coming to the earth, “Christ himself was like God in every-thing…. But he gave up his place with God and made himself nothing. He was born to be a man and became like a servantPhilippians 2:6–7 (NCV).

Why? Why did Jesus travel so far?

I was asking myself that question when I spotted the squirrels outside my window. A family of black-tailed squirrels has made its home amid the roots of the tree north of my office.

We’ve been neighbors for three years now. They watch me peck the keyboard. I watch them store their nuts and climb the trunk. We’re mutually amused. I could watch them all day. Sometimes I do.

But I’ve never considered becoming one of them. The squirrel world holds no appeal to me. Who wants to sleep next to a hairy rodent with beady eyes? (No comments from you wives who feel you already do.) Give up the Rocky Mountains, bass fishing, weddings, and laughter for a hole in the ground and a diet of dirty nuts? Count me out.

But count Jesus in. What a world he left. Our classiest mansion would be a tree trunk to him. Earth’s finest cuisine would be walnuts on heaven’s table. And the idea of becoming a squirrel with claws and tiny teeth and a furry tail? It’s nothing compared to God becoming a one-celled embryo and entering the womb of Mary.

But he did. The God of the universe kicked against the wall of a womb, was born into the poverty of a peasant, and spent his first night in the feed trough of a cow. “The Word became flesh and lived among usJohn 1:14 (NRSV). The God of the universe left the glory of heaven and moved into the neighborhood. Our neighborhood! Who could have imagined he would do such a thing.

Why?  He loves to be with the ones he loves.

Question: Why did Jesus leave His place of majesty and humble Himself to this Earth?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/07/28/ml_he-loves/

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Max Lucado
From: Next Door Savior
Copyright (W Publishing Group, 2003) Max Lucado

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by Max Lucado
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The request came when I was twenty. “Can you address our church youth group?” We aren’t talking citywide crusade here. Think more in terms of a dozen kids around a West Texas campfire. I was new to the faith, hence new to the power of the faith. I told my story, and, lo and behold, they listened! One even approached me afterward and said something like, “That moved me, Max.” My chest lifted, and my feet shifted just a step in the direction of the spotlight.

God has been nudging me back ever since.

Some of you don’t relate. The limelight never woos you. You and John the Baptist sing the same tune: “He must become greater and greater, and I must become less and less” (John 3:30, NLT). God bless you. You might pray for the rest of us. We applause-aholics have done it all: dropped names, sung loudly, dressed up to look classy, dressed down to look cool, quoted authors we’ve never read, spouted Greek we’ve never studied. For the life of me, I believe Satan trains battalions of demons to whisper one question in our ears: “What are people thinking of you?”

A deadly query. What they think of us matters not. What they think of God matters all. God will not share his glory with another (Isaiah 42:8). Next time you need a nudge away from the spotlight, remember: You are simply one link in a chain, an unimportant link at that.

Remember the other messengers God has used?

A donkey to speak to Balaam (Numbers 22:28).

A staff-turned-snake to stir Pharaoh (Exodus 7:10).

He used stubborn oxen to make a point about reverence and a big fish to make a point about reluctant preachers (I Samuel 6:1-12; Jonah 1:1-17)

God doesn’t need you and me to do his work. We are expedient messengers, ambassadors by his kindness, not by our cleverness.

It’s not about us, and it angers him when we think it is.

We who are entrusted with the gospel dare not seek applause but best deflect applause. For our message is about Someone else.

Question: How can we seek to be humble, without paradoxically becoming prideful of our humility?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2009/07/24/ml_about-him/

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Max Lucado
From: It’s Not About Me
Copyright (Thomas Nelson, 2007), Max Lucado
Used by permission

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