Category: <span>thoughts by Charles Spurgeon</span>

by Charles H. Spurgeon

Tree branchesCatch for us the foxes, the little foxes that ruin the vineyards, our vineyards that are in bloom.”  Song of Solomon 2:15

A little thorn may cause much suffering. A little cloud may hide the sun. Little foxes spoil the vines; and little sins do mischief to the tender heart. These little sins burrow in the soul, and make it so full of that which is hateful to Christ, that He will hold no comfortable fellowship and communion with us. A great sin cannot destroy a Christian, but a little sin can make him or her miserable. Jesus will not walk with His people unless they turn away from every known sin. He says, “If you obey my commands, you will remain in my love, just as I have obeyed my Father’s commands and remain in his love.” (John 15:10)

Some Christians very seldom enjoy their Savior’s presence. How can this be? Surely it must be deeply hurtful for a tender child to be separated from their father. Aren’t you a child of God, and yet satisfied to go on without seeing your Father’s face? Aren’t you the spouse of Christ, and yet you’re content without His company? If so, you’ve fallen into a sad state, for when He has left her the pure spouse of Christ mourns like a dove without her mate.

Ask the question, what has driven Christ from you? He hides His face behind the wall of your sins. That wall may be built up of little pebbles as easily as it may be built up of great stones. The sea is made of drops; the rocks are made of grains: and the sea which divides you from Christ may be filled with the drops of your little sins; and the rock which has nearly wrecked your boat, may have been made by the daily working of the coral insects of your little sins. If you want to live with Christ, and walk with Christ, and see Christ, and have fellowship with Christ, take heed of “the little foxes that ruin the vineyards.” Jesus invites you to go with Him and take them. Jesus will surely be with you and help you eliminate foxes by His mighty power. Go with Him to the hunting!

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2013/12/03/cs_little-sins/

Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

_________________________________________

Christmas Christmas Section Christmas

follow us on Facebook follow on Facebook follow us on Twitterfollow on Twitter follow by EMAIL

follow by RSS Feed

Homepages:
Homepage of Devotions
Homepage of Main Website

Short Thoughts For Mobile DevicesGod-daily.com

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

Since they could not get him to Jesus because of the crowd, they made an opening in the roof above Jesus and, after digging through it, lowered the mat the paralyzed man was lying on.” Mark 2:4

Faith is full of inventions. The house was full and a crowd blocked up the door, but faith found a way of getting to the Lord and placing the paralytic man before Him. It seems, according to Luke 5:19, that roof tiling had to be removed, which would make dust and cause minor danger to those below. But where the need is urgent we shouldn’t mind running some risks and rustling some feathers. If we cannot direct sinners to Jesus by ordinary methods, then we must use extraordinary ones!

Jesus was there to heal, and therefore, ignoring the consequences, the paralyzed man’s friends risked everything in faith so that he might have his sins forgiven. I so dearly wish that we would have more daring faith like this! Can we seek this kind of faith for ourselves and for our co-workers? Can we promise today to perform some new noble act for the love of God’s children for the glory of the Lord? The world is constantly inventing, and faith may invent too in order to reach the outcasts who lie in need around us.

Is the Lord among us right now? Have we seen His face for ourselves this morning? Have we felt His healing power? If so, then through doors, through windows, or through roofs, let us labor to bring poor souls to Jesus, ignoring the consequences. If hunger for physical healing can break through roofs, surely hunger for souls should not to be hindered. It was the presence of Jesus, after all, which excited such courage in the friends of the paralyzed man. All means are good when faith and love are truly set on winning souls.

Lord, make us quick to suggest methods of reaching those who don’t know You, and bold to carry these methods out!

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2012/11/08/cs_through-even-roofs/

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon,
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.

It is enough for the disciple to be like his teacher, and the servant like his master.” Matthew 10:25a (ESV)

No one will dispute that it is enough for the disciple to be like his teacher, since it would be improper for the servant to be exalted above his Master. When our Lord was on Earth, what sort of treatment did He receive? Were His claims acknowledged, His instructions followed, and His perfections worshiped by those He came to bless? No: “He was despised and rejected by men, a man of sorrows, and familiar with suffering.” (Isaiah 53:3)

Outside the camp was His place, and cross-bearing was His occupation. Did the world provide Him with comfort and rest? No: “Foxes have holes and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has no place to lay his head.” (Matthew 8:20)

This inhospitable world offered Him no shelter. It cast Him out and crucified Him. You must expect the same, if you are a follower of Jesus, and maintain a consistent, Christ-like walk and conversation in your spiritual life. Other people, who see your increasing discipleship, will treat you as they treated the Savior: With despisal.

Don’t think that the world will admire you, or that the more holy and the more Christ-like you are, the more peaceably people will act towards you. If people did not prize the polished gem, do you expect that they will value the jewel in the rough? “If they have called the master of the house Beelzebul, how much more will they malign those of his household.” (Matthew 10:25b, ESV)

If we were more like Christ, we would be more hated by His enemies. It would be a sad dishonor for a child of God to be the world’s favorite. It is a troubling omen to hear a wicked world clap its hands and shout “Well done” to the Christian person. We may begin to look to our character (and wonder whether we have not been doing wrong) when the unrighteous give us their admiration.

Let us be true to our Master, and accept no exaltation from a blind and depraved world which scorns and rejects Him. Far be it from us to seek a crown of honor after our Lord received only a crown of thorn!

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2012/04/05/cs_scorned-like-the-master/

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2009.

Daily DevotionalsWhoever believes and is baptized will be savedMark 16:16

The pastor asked the inhabitants of the island of how someone must be saved.

An old man replied, “We will be saved if we repent, and forsake our sins, and turn to God.

Yes,” said a middle-aged female, “and with a true heart too.”

“I agree,” answered a third, “and with prayer.” And, added a fourth, “It must be the prayer from the heart.”

And we must be diligent too,” said a fifth, “and keep the commandments.”

After each had contributed to the discussion, they felt that a decent creed had been compiled. They all turned and waited for the pastor’s approval. But instead they had aroused deep pity in his heart.

The worldly mind always tries to map out a way we can do works and become great, but the Lord’s way is just the opposite. Believing and being baptized aren’t deeds to be gloried in. They are so simple that boasting is impossible, and God deserves all the praise for the free grace He has given.

To believe is simply to trust, to depend, to rely on Christ Jesus. To be baptized is to submit to the ordinance which our Lord fulfilled at Jordan, to which the earliest believers submitted at Pentecost, and to which the jailer obeyed the night of his conversion. The outward sign of baptism does not save, but it encompasses our death, burial, and resurrection with Jesus, and, like the Lord’s Supper, shouldn’t be neglected.

It may be that you are unsaved. What is the reason? Do you think Jesus’ singular path of salvation is unclear? But how can that be when God has given us His own word and His assurance of its clarity? Do you think it is too easy? Why, then, do you not accept and embrace it? Its ease leaves those who choose to neglect it without excuse.

If you are not a believer, then remember there is only one door, and if you will not enter by it you will perish in your sins. But if you do believe in Jesus, then my dear friend, dismiss your fears, for you will surely be saved.

Question: Do we sometimes put too much confidence in our own good works? How can we begin to focus more on God?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2011/10/31/cs_believe-and-be-saved/
_________________________________________

Short Thoughts for Cell Phones – God-daily.com

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook
follow us on Twitterfollow us on Twitter

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.

I pray not that Thou shouldst take them out of the world.John 17:15

Christian DevotionalIt is a sweet and blessed event which will occur to all believers in God’s own time: Going home to be with Jesus. In a few more years the Lord’s soldiers, who are now fighting “the good fight of faith” (1 Timothy 6:12) will be done with conflict, and will enter into the joy of their Lord.

But although Christ prays that His people will eventually be with Him where He is, He does not ask that they may be taken at once away from this world to heaven. He wishes them to stay here. Yet how frequently does the wearied pilgrim put up the prayer, “Oh that I had wings like a dove! For then would I fly away and be at rest.” But Christ does not pray like that. He leaves us in His Father’s hands until, like corn fully ripe, we shall each be gathered into our Master’s presence.

Jesus does not plead for our instant removal by death. Our abiding in the flesh is needed for others if not profitable for ourselves. He asks that we be kept from evil, but He never asks for us to be admitted to the inheritance in glory until we are of full readiness.

Christians often want to die when they have any trouble. Ask them why, and they tell you, “Because we would be with the Lord.” I fear it is not so much because they are longing to be with the Lord, as because they desire to get rid of their troubles. If it were so, they would feel the same wish to die at other times when not under the pressure of trial. They want to go home, not so much for the Savior’s company, as to be at rest. Now it is quite right to desire to depart if we can do it in the same spirit that Paul did, because to be with Christ is far better, but the wish to escape from trouble is a selfish one. (Philippians 1:21-26)

Let your desire be to glorify God by your life here as long as He pleases, even though it is in the midst of toil, conflict, and suffering, leave Him to say when “it is enough.”

Question: How do you pray in times of toil, conflict, and suffering?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2011/09/04/cs_taken-out-of-the-world/
_________________________________________

Short Thoughts for Cell Phones – God-daily.com

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook
follow us on Twitterfollow us on Twitter

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon – Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.

You are all sons of the light and sons of the day. We do not belong to the night or to the darkness. So then, let us not be like others, who are asleep, but let us be alert and self-controlled.” 1 Thessalonians 5:5-6

There are many ways of promoting Christian alertness. Among the many ways, let me strongly advise Christians to converse together concerning the ways of the Lord. In John Bunyan’s classic book “The Pilgrim’s Progress,” the characters named Christian and Hopeful, as they journeyed towards the Celestial City, said to themselves, “To prevent drowsiness in this place, let us fall into deep discussion.” Christian inquired, “Brother, where shall we begin?” And Hopeful answered, “Where God began with us.” Then Christian sang this song:

When saints do sleepy grow, let them come hither
And hear how these two pilgrims talk together;
Yea, let them learn of them, in any wise
Thus to keep open their drowsy slumbering eyes.
Saints’ fellowship, if it be managed well,
Keeps them awake, and that in spite of hell.”

Christians who isolate themselves and walk alone are likely to grow drowsy. Keep company with fellow Christians and you will be kept wakeful, refreshed, and encouraged to make diligent progress on the road to heaven. But as you enjoy fellowship with others, take care that the theme of your conversation is the Lord Jesus. Let the eye of faith be constantly looking to Him, let your heart be full of Him, and let your lips speak of His worth.

Friend, live near to the cross, and you will not sleep. Labor to meditate, with a deep sense of the value, about the place you will someday be going. If you remember that you are going to heaven, you will not sleep on the road. If you are aware that hell is conspicuously near, and the devil pursuing you, you will not dawdle. My friend, will you sleep while the pearly gates are open, with the songs of angels waiting for you to join them, and a crown of gold ready for your head? Certainly not! So in holy fellowship continue to watch and pray that you will not be led into temptation.

Questions: Are there times of life where you become complacent or unaware in your spiritual journey? How does Spurgeon suggest that you guard against this tendency?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2011/04/09/cs_alert-and-self-controlled/
_________________________________________

NEW: God-daily.com – Short Thoughts for Mobile Devices

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook
follow us on Twitterfollow us on Twitter

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon. Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

God saw that the light was good, and He separated the light from the darkness.” Genesis 1:4

Light is good since it began to exist from God’s good command, “Let there be light.” We who enjoy it should be more grateful for it than we are, and see more of God in it and by it. Physical light is said by Solomon to be sweet, but gospel light is infinitely more precious, for it reveals eternal things and ministers to our immortal natures.

When the Holy Spirit gives us spiritual light, and opens our eyes to see clearly the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. We see clearly our sin in its true colors, and ourselves in our real position. We see the Most Holy God as He reveals Himself, His plan of mercy, and the world to come as His Word describes it. Spiritual light has many beams and colors, but whether they are knowledge, joy, holiness, or life, all are divinely good. If the light received is good, then God, the essential light, is ever so much more glorious.

Lord Jesus, since Your light is so good, give us more of it, and more of yourself, more of the true light.

When God brings light to the world, division is necessary to separate it from darkness. Light and darkness have nothing in common. Since God has divided them, we must not join them. Children of light must be sober, honest, and bold in their Lord’s work, leaving the works of darkness behind.

Our churches should divide the light from the darkness with great discipline, and we should do the same by being separated from the world by walking in God’s light instead of the dark paths. In action, in judgment, in hearing, in teaching, in association, we must discern between the precious and the vile, and maintain the great distinction which the Lord made upon the world’s first day.

Lord Jesus, be our light throughout the entire day, for Your light is the light of us all.

Question: Are there areas of your life where God’s light is dim or absent? Is it time to let Him in?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2011/02/03/cs-light-and-darkness/

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.  Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2010.

Abel kept flocks.” Genesis 4:2

Christian Devotional

As a shepherd, Abel “brought fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering.” (Genesis 4:4) This early type (foreshadowing) of our Lord is clear and distinct. Like the first streak of light which tinges the east at sunrise, it does not reveal everything, but it clearly reveals the great fact that the sun is coming.

We see Abel, a shepherd and yet a priest, offering a sacrifice of sweet smell unto God. Compare this to our Lord, who brings before His Father a sacrifice to which Jehovah has and will forever respect.

Abel was hated by his brother. He was hated without a cause. And so too was our Savior. The natural and carnal man hated the accepted man in whom the Spirit of grace was found, and would not rest until his blood had been shed.

Abel died, and shed his own blood on his altar in sacrifice. He foreshadows how the Lord Jesus would be slain by the hatred of man while serving as a priest. “The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” (John 10:11) Let us weep over Him as we view Him slain by the hatred of mankind, staining His altar with His own blood.

Abel’s blood speaketh.The LORD said, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.”” (Genesis 4:10) The blood of Jesus has a mighty tongue, and the importance of its prevailing cry is not vengeance but mercy. It is precious beyond all preciousness to stand at the altar of our good Shepherd. We see Him bleeding there as the slaughtered priest, and then hear His blood speaking peace to all His flock: Peace in our conscience, peace between Jew and Gentile, peace between man and his offended Maker, peace all down the ages of eternity for blood-washed people.

Abel is the first shepherd in order of time, but our hearts will forever place Jesus first in order of excellence. God, great Keeper of the sheep, we the people of Your pasture bless You with our whole hearts when we see You slain for us.

Question: Have you ever considered how Abel’s death foreshadowed Christ’s? What does his death tell us about Christ’s?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2011/01/28/cs_slain-for-us/
_________________________________________

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook
follow us on Twitterfollow us on Twitter

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2010.

“Therefore, brethren, we are debtors.” Romans 8:12 (KJV)

As God’s creatures, we are all debtors to Him. We are indebted to obey Him with all our body, and soul, and strength. (Mark 12:30) All people have broken His commandments, and so we are debtors to His justice. We owe God a vast amount which we are not able to pay.

But Christians do not owe God’s justice anything, for Christ has paid the debt His people owed. For this reason the believer owes his debt instead to love. I am a debtor to God’s grace and forgiving mercy; but I am no debtor to His justice, for He will never accuse me of a debt already paid.

Christ said, “It is finished!” (John 19:30) and by that He meant that whatever His people owed was wiped away forever from the book of remembrance. Christ has fully and finally satisfied divine justice. The account is settled! The handwriting is nailed to the cross! The receipt is given! And we are debtors to God’s justice no longer.

But because we are not debtors to our Lord in that sense, we become ten times more debtors to God than we were before to His love. My friend, pause and ponder for a moment. What a debtor you are to divine sovereignty! How much you owe to His love, for He gave His own Son who died for you. Consider how much you owe to His forgiving grace, that after ten thousand sins against Him, He loves you as infinitely as ever.

Consider what you owe to His power, how He has raised you from your death in sin, preserved your spiritual life, kept you from falling, and though a thousand enemies have attempted to divert your path, nevertheless you have been able to “hold unswervingly to the hope we profess, for he who promised is faithful.” (Hebrews 10:23)

Consider what you owe to His unchanging nature. Though you have changed a thousand times, He has not changed once. You are as deep in debt as you can be to every attribute of God. To God you owe yourself, and all you have. And for once, what a wonderful debt to owe! Yield yourself therefore “as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God – this is your spiritual act of worship.” (Romans 12:1)

Question: How have you been living out your debt of love to God as a “living sacrifice” this week?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2011/01/12/cs_debt-to-your-lord/
_________________________________________

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook
follow us on Twitterfollow us on Twitter

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally, written by Charles H. Spurgeon:  Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer.

“He will save his people from their sins.” Matthew 1:21

Christian DevotionalSome people, if asked how they understand “salvation,” will reply, “Being saved from hell and taken to heaven.” This is one result of salvation, but it’s not even close to all that it is.

It’s true that our Lord Jesus Christ saves His people from God’s coming wrath. He saves us from the condemnation which their sins bring on us. But His triumph is far more complete than this. He saves His people “from their sins.” When Christ saves a man or woman, He casts Satan from his throne, and will not let Satan be their master anymore.

No one is truly Christian if sin still reigns over their body. Sin will still remain in us, but it will never have control. There will be a battle within ourselves for control, with our old nature fighting against the new law and the new spirit which God has given us. But sin will never get the upper hand. Christ will be Master of the heart, and so sin must be removed from heart, mind, and action.

Jesus, the Lion of the tribe of Judah, will prevail. Satan, the dragon, will be cast out. Is sin still reigning within you? If you continue to engage in unrepentant sin, your heart is unchanged, and if your heart is unchanged you are not saved. If the Savior hasn’t sanctified you, renewed you, and given you a hatred of sin and a love of holiness, He has done nothing discernible in you. The grace which does not make a life more beautiful is a worthless counterfeit. Christ saves His people, not in their sins, but from them, since “without holiness no one will see the Lord” (Hebrews 12:14). “Everyone who confesses the name of the Lord must turn away from wickedness.” (2 Timothy 2:19)

If we continue to cavalierly engage in sinful behaviors, how can we hope to be counted among His people? Lord, save me now from all evil, and enable me to honor my Savior in both my heart and my life.

Question: How would you explain “salvation” to someone who asked you what it means?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2011/01/03/cs_saved-from-sin/

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, published in “Mornings & Evenings,”

All of them were filled with the Holy SpiritActs 2:4

Rich were the blessings on the day of Pentecost when the believers were filled with the Holy Spirit. It’s impossible to overestimate the consequences of this sacred filling of the soul. Life, comfort, light, purity, power, peace, and many other precious blessings are inseparable from the Spirit’s presence.

As sacred oil, He anoints the head of the believer, sets them apart to the priesthood of saints, and gives them grace to rightly live out their role in His Kingdom.

As the only truly purifying water He cleanses us from the power of sin and sanctifies us holy, working in us to will and to do the Lord’s good pleasure.

As the light, He made appeal to us even when we were still lost, and now He reveals the Lord Jesus to us and in us, guiding us in the way of righteousness. Enlightened by His pure celestial ray, we no longer stumble in darkness but now walk in the light of the Lord.

As fire, He both purges us from impurity, and sets our hallowed nature ablaze. He is the sacrificial flame by which we are enabled to offer our whole souls as a living sacrifice to God.

As heavenly dew, He removes our barrenness and fertilizes our lives. Oh how we yearn that He would drop from above on us at this hour! Such morning dew would be a sweet commencement for the day.

As the dove, with wings of peaceful love He frets over His Church and the souls of believers. And as a Comforter He dispels the cares and doubts which ruin the peace of His beloved. He descends on the chosen like He did on Lord in Jordan, and bears witness to our status as children of the Lord by working in us a childlike spirit by which we cry “Abba, Father.”

As the wind, He brings the breath of life to His people. He performs the work by which the spiritual creation is given life and sustained. Pray to God that we will feel His wondrous presence today and every day!

Question: Which of these analogies hit closest to home for you today? Why, and what truth about God does it reveal and reaffirm?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2010/12/04/cs_god-brings-life/
_________________________________________

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook
follow us on Twitterfollow us on Twitter

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon. Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

It was you who set all the boundaries of the earth; you made both summer and winter.Psalm 74:17

My friend, as we begin this wintry month, begin it with God. The cold snows and the piercing winds all remind us that God keeps His covenant day and night, and assures us that He will also keep the glorious covenant which He made with us in the person of Christ Jesus. God, who remains true to His Word during the turning of the seasons in this poor sin-polluted world, will prove faithful in His dealings with His own well-beloved sons and daughters.

Winter in the soul is often an uncomfortable season. If now you are facing uncomfortable circumstances or discouraging experiences, it will feel very painful to you. But there is comfort in the fact that the Lord makes both summer and winter. He knows your pain. He sends the sharp blasts of adversity to nip the buds of expectation. He scatters the frost like ashes over the once lush meadows of our joy.

He does it all. He is the great Winter King, and rules the realms of frost. Therefore you should not murmur against Him. Losses, crosses, heaviness, sickness, poverty, and a thousand other ills can, if we choose, be turned into a blessing of the Lord, and such trials come to us with wise design. Frosts kill deadly insects, and restrains raging diseases. I truly hope that such good results would always flow from our winters of turmoil!

Let us wrap ourselves in the warm garments of His promises, and go forth to work for His glory during this season, for it those who slack off in their work during the winters often are forced to beg in summer due to their inactivity, and end up with nothing. Just as during winter we cherish a fire’s pleasant glow and warming heat, let us cherish our Lord, who is the constant source of warmth and comfort in every time of trouble. Let us draw near to Him, and in Him find joy and peace in believing.

Question: Regardless of the weather outside, how do you handle the winters of your soul?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2010/11/29/cs_god-in-winter/

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon. Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2010.

You art my portion, O Lord.Psalm 119:57, KJV

Look at your possessions, all those who believe in Christ Jesus, and compare your portion with that give to your fellow men.

Some of have their riches in the field. They are rich in land, and their harvests yield them a golden increase. But what good are harvests compared with your God, who is the God of harvests? Of what use are bursting barns full of grain compared with Him, who is the expert caretaker, and feeds you with the bread of heaven?

Some have their riches in the city. Their wealth is abundant, and flows to them in constant streams, until they become overloaded with gold. But what good is gold compared with your God? You couldn’t live on it. Your spiritual life could not be sustained by it. Can you buy relief from a troubled conscience; can gold allay its pangs? Apply riches to a despondent heart, and see if it could satisfy a solitary groan, or lessen even a single grief. But you have God, and in Him you have more than gold or riches ever could buy.

Some have their riches in that which most men love – applause and fame. But ask yourself, isn’t your God more to you than that? What if great crows cheered their applause to you, would this prepare you to pass the Jordan, or help you in prospect of judgment? No, there are grief’s in life which wealth cannot alleviate. There is the deep need of a dying hour, for which no riches can provide. But when you have God for your portion, you have more than all else put together. In Him every need is met, whether in life or in death.

With God you are rich indeed, for He will supply your need, comfort your heart, assuage your grief, guide your steps, be with you in the dark valley, and then take you home, to enjoy Him as your portion forever.

I have enough,” said Esau, and this is the best thing a worldly man can say. But Jacob replies, “I have all things,” which is a height too lofty for souls absent from their Savior, but not for you, who know Him in whom every need is met.

Questions: Have you been comparing yourself with others lately? How is this kind of comparison ultimately unfruitful?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2010/10/02/cs_true-riches/

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer,  2010.

Praise be to God, who has not rejected my prayer or withheld his love from me!Psalm 66:20

If we honestly look back on the sort of prayers we often pray, we will be filled with wonder that God has ever answered them. There may be some who think their prayers worthy of acceptance, like the Pharisee did. But the true Christian, in a more enlightened retrospect, weeps over their prayers, and if they could retrace their steps would desire to pray more truly, more earnestly. (Luke 18:9-14)

Think about how cold your prayers often are. When praying alone in your room (Matthew 6:6) you should wrestle as Jacob did. (Genesis 32:22-32) But instead, your petitions have been faint and few. They have been far removed from that humble, believing, persevering faith, which cries, “I will not let you go unless you bless me.” (Genesis 32:26)

Yet, how wonderful is it that God has nonetheless heard these cold prayers, and not only heard, but answered them!

Reflect also how infrequent your prayers are. Unless you’re in trouble, that is. That’s when people hasten to pray! When deliverance has come, where has been your constant prayer of thanks? Yet, even when you cease to pray diligently, God does not cease to bless. When you have neglected God in prayer, God has not deserted you. His bright glorious light continues to shine.

Oh how marvelous it is that the Lord pays close attention to those intermittent spasms of importunity, those halfhearted desperate prayers which may come and go like the wind! What a God He is to hear the prayers of those who come to Him when they have pressing wants, but neglect Him when they have received a mercy. He even hears those who approach Him when they are forced to come, but who almost forget to address Him when mercies are plentiful and sorrows are few.

Let His gracious kindness in hearing such prayers touch our hearts, so that we may “pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests.” (Ephesians 6:18)

Questions: In what areas have you been “praying halfheartedly” lately? In what areas can you see that God has been at work despite your lack of prayer?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2010/07/12/cs_halfhearted-prayer/

_________________________________________

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2010.

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Psalm 22:1

We here behold the Savior in the depth of sorrow. Nowhere else bears witness to the griefs of Christ as forcefully as Calvary, and no other moment at Calvary is as full of agony as when His anguished cry splits the air: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

At this moment physical weakness united with acute mental torture from the shame and disgrace through which He had to pass. He suffered spiritual agony surpassing all expression, resulting from the departure of His Father’s presence. This was the darkest night of His horror. Then He descended the abyss of suffering. No man can comprehend the full meaning of these words.

Sometimes we ourselves might want to cry out, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” There are seasons when the brightness of our Father’s smile is eclipsed by clouds and darkness. But we must remember that God never really forsakes us. It is seems as though we are forsaken, but in Christ’s case He actually was.

We grieve as we perceive a little withdrawal of our Father’s love. But the real turning away of God’s face from His Son, who can calculate how deep the agony which it caused Him?

In our case, our cry is often dictated by unbelief. In His case, it was the utterance of a dreadful fact, for God had really turned away from Him for a season.

For all you who are distressed, who once lived in the sunshine of God’s face, but are now eclipsed for a time in darkness, remember that He has not actually forsaken you. God in the clouds is as much our God as when He shines forth in all the light of His grace. But since even the thought that He has forsaken us gives us agony, what must the woe of the Savior have been when He exclaimed, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?

Question: When someone is going through a time when they feel forsaken, how can we comfort them with God’s love?

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2010/06/24/cs_agony-of-the-savior/
_________________________________________

follow us on Facebook follow us on Facebook

Share this on:

Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon Thoughts by Men