Category: <span>thoughts by Charles Spurgeon</span>

Isaiah 43:25

Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.”  Psalm 119:49

Whatever your specific need is, you will likely find a promise about it in the Bible.

Are you feeling wearied and weak because your life has been troubling and tiring? Here is the promise: “He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak.” (Isaiah 40:29) When you read such a promise, take it back to our great God who promised it, and ask Him to fulfill His own word.

Are you seeking after Christ, and yearning for closer relationship with Him? This promise shines like a star upon you: “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.” (Matthew 5:6) Take that promise to God’s throne continually. Do not plead anything else, but go to God over and over again, praying “Lord, You have said it, I humbly ask that You do as You have said.”

Are you distressed because of sin, and burdened with the heavy load of your wrongdoings? Listen to these words: “I, even I, am he who blots out your transgressions, for my own sake, and remembers your sins no more.” (Isaiah 43:25) You have no worth of your own to deserve God’s pardon, but plead His written promises and He will perform them.

Are you afraid that you won’t be able to persevere to the end? Do you fear that, after having thought yourself to be a child of God, you might instead be a ‘castaway’? Take this word of grace to God’s throne and plead it: “Though the mountains be shaken and the hills be removed, yet my unfailing love for you will not be shaken nor my covenant of peace be removed.” (Isaiah 54:10)

If you have lost the sweet sense of the Savior’s presence, and are seeking Him with a sorrowful heart, remember these promises: “Return to me, and I will return to you” (Malachi 3:7) and “For a brief moment I abandoned you, but with deep compassion I will bring you back.” (Isaiah 54:7) Rest your faith upon God’s own word, and whatever your fears or desires, look to God’s “Bank of Faith” in your Father’s written word, saying, “Remember your word to your servant, for you have given me hope.

Question: Which of God’s promises that you just read resonated most powerfully with you, and why?

by Charles H. Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

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Isaiah 40:31 They that wait on the Lord will renew their strength.

“Let the people renew their strength.” Isaiah 41:1 (KJV)

All things on earth need to be renewed. No created thing sustains itself. “Thou renewest the face of the earth,” was the Psalmist’s cry. (Psalm 104:30) Even the trees, which do not themselves clamor for care, and do not shorten their lives with labor, must drink of the rain of heaven and absorb the hidden treasures of the soil. The cedars of Lebanon which God has planted only live because day by day they are filled with sap freshly drawn from the earth. (Isaiah 14:8)

In the same way, a man’s life cannot be sustained without constant renewal from God. As it is necessary to repair the waste of the body by frequent meals, so we must repair the waste of the soul by feeding on the Book of God, or by listening to the preached Word, or by the soul-quenching table of communion.

How depressed will our souls become when God’s provisions are neglected! What unfortunate Christians are those who live without the diligent use of the Word of God and secret prayer! If our piety can live without God, then it is not of divine origin. It is only a dream. If God had begotten it, it would wait on Him as the flowers wait on the dew. Without constant restoration we are not ready for the perpetual assaults of hell, or the stern afflictions of heaven, or even for the strifes within.

When the whirlwind is loosed, woe to the tree that has not absorbed the fresh sap, and grasped the rock with many intertwisted roots.

When fearsome storms arise, woe to the mariners who have not strengthened their mast, nor cast their anchor, nor sought refuge. If we despise what is good and grow weaker, the evil will gather strength, and struggle desperately for the mastery over us. And so a painful desolation and a lamentable disgrace will follow.

Let us draw near to the feet of divine mercy in humble supplication, and we will realize the fulfillment of the promise: “They that wait on the Lord shall renew their strength.” (Isaiah 40:31, KJV)

Question: Where do you draw renewal from God? Are there additional resources that God has provided but you currently are not using?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2010.

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Sky scene. Serenity with God.

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.Matthew 11:28

The cry of the Christian faith is the gentle word, “Come.” The Jewish law harshly said, “Go, step carefully on the path in which you walk. If you break the commandments, you will perish; keep them, and you will live.” The law was a burden even as it was a blessing, which drove men and women before it harshly; the gospel draws with arms of love.

Jesus is the good Shepherd going before His sheep, urging them follow Him, and always leading them onwards with the sweet word, “Come.” The law repels, the gospel attracts. The law shows the distance which there is between God and man; the gospel bridges that awful chasm, and brings the sinner across it.

From the first moment of your spiritual life until you are ushered into glory, the language of Christ to you will be, Come, come to me.” As a mother puts out her finger to her little child and woos it to walk by saying, “Come,” even so does Jesus. He will always be ahead of you, urging you follow Him as the soldier follows his captain. He will always go before you to pave your way, and clear your path, and you will hear His winsome voice calling you after Him all through your life. Later, in the solemn hour of death, His sweet words with which He will usher you into the heavenly world will be “Come, you who are so blessed of my Father.”

This is not only Christ’s cry to you, but, if you are a believer, this is your cry to Christ: “Come! come!” You will be longing for His second coming; you will be saying, “Come quickly, come Lord Jesus.” You will be yearning for nearer and closer communion with Him. As His voice calls to you “Come,” your response to Him will also be “Come, Lord, and live with me. Come, and occupy alone the throne of my heart; reign there without a rival, and dedicate me entirely to Your service.”

Questions: When God calls you, are you ready to hear and obey? How can you prepare your mind and heart?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon. Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

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The Unsearchable Riches of Christ - Devotional

Although I am less than the least of all God’s people, this grace was given me: to preach to the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ, 9) and to make plain to everyone the administration of this mystery, which for ages past was kept hidden in God, who created all things.”  Ephesians 3:8-9

Our God has riches beyond the count of arithmetic, the measurement of reason, the dream of imagination, or the eloquence of words. They are unsearchable! You may look, and study, and weigh, but Jesus is a greater Savior than you imagine Him to be even on your best day!

Our Lord is more ready to forgive your sin than you are able to transgress.

Our Master is more willing to supply your wants than you are to confess them.

Our Master has riches of happiness to give you now. He can make you to lie down in green pastures, and lead you beside still waters. There is no music like His music. He is the Shepherd and you are the sheep when you lie down at His feet. There is no love like His, and neither Earth nor Heaven can match it. To know Christ and to be found in Him, oh what a life, what a joy! This is everything that is good and wonderful in life.

Never tolerate low thoughts of our Lord Jesus. If you do, you will end up only crowning Him with a silver crown when He deserves the finest gold.

Our Lord does not treat His servants ungraciously; He gives to them as a king gives to a king. He gives them two heavens: A heaven below where we may serve Him, and a heaven above where we may delight in Him forever. His unsearchable riches will be best known in eternity. He will give you on the way to heaven all you need. Your place of defense will be the ammunition of rocks, and your bread and water will be provided; but it is there, THERE in His presence, where you will hear the song of His people that triumph, the shout of the feast, and shall have a face-to-face view of the glorious and beloved One.

The unsearchable riches of Christ! This is the tune for the musicians of Earth, and the song for the harpers of Heaven. Lord, teach us more and more of Jesus, and we will tell the good news to others.

Question: How has God revealed the riches of Christ in your life lately?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon. Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008

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Devotional on True Freedom

“… to preach deliverance to the captives …” Luke 4:18 (KJV)

No one but Jesus can give deliverance to captives. Real liberty comes from Him alone.

It is a liberty righteously bestowed. The Son, who is Heir of all things, has a right to set people free. The saints honor the justice of God, which secures their salvation.

It is a liberty which has been dearly purchased. Christ speaks it by His power, but He bought it by His blood. He makes you free, but it is by His own bonds. You are free and clear, because He bore your burden for you. You have liberty because He has suffered in your place. But, though dearly purchased, He freely gives it. Jesus asks nothing of us as a preparation for this liberty. He finds us sitting in sackcloth and ashes, and encourages us to put on the beautiful array of freedom. He saves us just as we are, and all without our help or merit.

When Jesus sets free, the liberty is perpetually entailed. No chains can bind us again. Let the Master say to me, “Captive, I have delivered you,” and it is done for ever. Satan may plot to enslave us, but if the Lord is on our side, whom shall we fear? The world, with its temptations, may seek to ensnare us, but mightier is He who is for us than all they who are against us. The machinations of our own deceitful hearts may harass and annoy us, but He who has begun the good work in us will carry it on and perfect it to the end. The foes of God and the enemies of man may gather their forces together, and come with concentrated fury against us, but if God acquits, who is he that condemns? Not more free is the eagle which mounts to his rocky nest and out soars the clouds than the soul Christ has delivered.

If we are no longer under the law, but free from its curse, let our liberty be practically exhibited in our serving God with gratitude and delight. “O LORD, truly I am your servant; I am your servant, the son of your maidservant; you have freed me from my chains.” (Psalm 116:16) Ask: “Lord, what would You have me do?”

Question: If true freedom is not total lack of restraint, but the divine enabling of being all we were meant to be, why does the Christian life sometimes feel restrictive?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon. Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer 2010.

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I want you to know that through Jesus the forgiveness of sins is proclaimed to you. Through him everyone who believes is justified from everything you could not be justified from by the law of Moses.Acts 13:38-39

Believers in Christ are justified, meaning we’re pardoned of our sin. God’s grace, received through faith, does not produce this fruit over time, but right now! Justification is the result of faith, and it is given to a person in the moment when they choose Christ and to follow Him with their heart, soul, strength, and mind.

All those who put their trust in Christ who have died stand before His throne entirely justified. And so will we when we put our trust in Him. The thief on the cross was justified the moment that he put his faith in Jesus. And Paul, after earning many gray hairs through years of constant service, was not any more justified than the thief who had performed no service at all.

We are today accepted by God, today freed from the guilt of sin, today acquitted before the throne of God. There are some grapes which we will not be able to gather until we enter heaven, but God’s acceptance is the ladder which He has lowered down, letting us into the vineyard. We are pardoned! Even now are our sins are remembered no longer. (Hebrews 8:12) Even now we stand in the sight of God accepted, as though we were never guilty: “There is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.” (Romans 8:1)

There is not a sin written in the Book of God, even now, against any one of His people. There is no speck, spot, wrinkle, or any such thing on any believer in the sight of the Judge of all the Earth. Let this privilege awaken us to our duty, and every day for as long as we live let us praise, worship, and serve wholeheartedly our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

Question: Since when we put our faith (trust) in God He remembers our sin no longer, how should we as believers react when we do sin now?

By Charles Spurgeon

Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008

. . . . . . .

Do you want to experience God’s love and forgiveness?

Action point:  On a piece of paper, ask God to show you all the sins He wants you to confess.  As they come to your mind, write them down.  When no more sins come to mind, write 1 John 1:9 across them.  Then know for sure that ALL your sins are forgiven.  If you start feeling guilty about them again, know that it is the Enemy harassing you.  God won’t convict you of those sins again.

Then ask Jesus to come into your life and be the director of your life from now on.

“Lord Jesus, I need You. Thank You for dying on the cross for my sins. I open the door of my life and receive You as my Savior and Lord. Thank You for forgiving my sins and giving me eternal life. Take control of the throne of my life. Make me the kind of person You want me to be.”


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If you sin again, confess that sin and claim His forgiveness.  You may find the article, “Spiritual Oxygen”  helpful.

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devotional

I will remember my covenant between me and you and all living creatures of every kind. Never again will the waters become a flood to destroy all life.Genesis 9:15

Notice the form of the promise. God does not say, “And when you remember and follow My covenant, then I will not destroy the earth.” What God actually said was “This is the sign of the covenant I am making between me and you and every living creature with you, a covenant for all generations to come: I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the earth.” (Genesis 9:12-13) The covenant depends not on our memory, which is fickle and frail, but on God’s memory, which is infinite and unchangeable.

It is not my remembering God, it is God’s remembering me which forms the foundation of my security. It is not my laying hold of His covenant, but His covenant’s laying hold on me. Glory be to God! Our salvation is secured by divine power, and even the minor aspects, which we may imagine might have been left to us, are guarded by His almighty strength.

Even the remembrance of the covenant is not left to our memories, for we might forget! But our Lord cannot forget the saints, whose names He has written on the palms of His hands. He is with us as He was with Israel in Egypt; the blood was on the door frames, but the Lord did not say, “When you see the blood I will pass over you,” but “When I see the blood I will pass over you.” (Exodus 12:13)

Looking to Jesus brings me joy and peace, but it is God’s looking to Jesus which secures my salvation and that of all His children. It is impossible for God to look at Christ (our bleeding Savior) and then to be angry with us for sins already punished in Him. No, it is not left with us to be saved by remembering the covenant. It is not upheld by our own effort, but of the Lord alone.

We should remember the covenant, and so we resolve do it through divine grace instead of our own power. But the hinge of our safety does not hang there. It is God’s remembering us, and hence the covenant is a beautiful and everlasting covenant.

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon, Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2011.

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devotional on praise glory

To Him be the glory forever! Amen.Romans 11:36

To Him be the glory forever!” This should be the single desire of all Christians. All other wishes must be come second to this one. The Christian may wish for prosperity in their business, but only insofar as it may help us to promote this–“To Him be the glory forever!” We may desire to attain more gifts and more graces, but it should only be that “To Him be the glory forever!

You are not acting as you ought to do when you are moved by any other motive than to give glory to your Lord. As a Christian, if you are “of God, and through God,” then live “to God.” Let nothing ever set your heart beating so mightily as love to Him. Let this ambition fire your soul; let it become the foundation of everything you do, and become your sustaining motive whenever your passion grows cold. Make God your only goal. When I depend on myself, sorrow begins; but my joy will be complete when God becomes my supreme delight. Let your desire for God’s glory be a growing desire. If you blessed Him in your youth, do not be content with the kind of praises you gave Him then.

Has God prospered your business? Give Him more as He has given you more.

Has God given you experience? Praise Him by stronger faith than you exercised at first.

Does your knowledge grow? Then sing more sweetly.

Do you enjoy happier times than you once had? Have you been healed from sickness, and has your sorrow been turned into peace and joy? Then give Him more music; increase the thankful fervor of your praise. Practically in your life give Him honor. The “Amen” to your praise to your great and gracious Lord will then increasingly become your own individual service and increasing holiness.

Question: Why is it sometimes tempting to take the praise and glory for ourselves instead of giving it to God?

Originally written by Charles H Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer.

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devotional

Praise the LORD, O my soul, and forget not all his benefitsPsalm 103:2

It is delightful and profitable to observe how the hand of God was upon the lives of ancient saints, to see His goodness deliver them, see His mercy pardon them, and see His faithfulness keep His covenant with them.

But isn’t it even more delightful and profitable for us to remember the hand of God working in our own lives? We should look back at our own history as being at least as full of God, as full of His goodness and of His truth, as the lives of any of the saints who have gone before. We do our Lord an injustice when we presume that He performed all His mighty acts for those in the past, but doesn’t perform wonders for us today.

Let’s review our own lives. Surely we will discover some happy incidents which are both refreshing to ourselves and glorifying to God.

Has God delivered you from trouble? Have you passed safely through rivers, supported by the divine presence? Have you walked through proverbial fires unharmed?

Remember, this is the God who gave Solomon the desire of his heart. Hasn’t He also often heard and answered your requests? This is the God of beautiful outpourings about whom David sang, “Who satisfies your desires with good things.” Has He never satiated you with blessing? Have you never been made to lie down in green pastures? Have you never been led by the still waters?

Surely the goodness of God has been the same to us as to the saints of the past. Let us then weave His mercies into a song. Let us take the pure gold of thankfulness, and the jewels of praise and make them into another crown for the head of Jesus. Let our souls make sweet music, music that is as exhilarating as that which came from David’s harp, while we praise the Lord whose mercy endures forever!

Question: How has God delivered you, personally?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

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daily devotional

All the house of Israel are impudent and hardhearted.Ezekiel 3:7 (KJV)

Are there any exceptions to being “impudent and hardhearted“? No, not even one. Even God’s chosen people are described this way.

If the “best” are this bad, then what about the “worst”? My friend, consider how you share in this universal accusation, and when you examine yourself, be ready to honestly assess your own guilt.

The first charge is impudence, or being “stubborn” (NLT). Before my conversion, I could sin and feel no conviction, hear of my guilt and remain unhumbled, and even freely admit my evil and feel no humiliation. When an unrepentant sinner goes to God’s house and pretends to pray to Him and praise Him, that’s hypocrisy of the worst kind!

Even after the day I was reborn, I have doubted my Lord to His face, murmured unashamed in His presence, worshiped before Him in an unworthy manner, and even sinned without repenting. If I weren’t so impudent and stubborn, I would have much more holy fear, and much deeper conviction of my spirit. I admit I am just like those in the impudent house of ancient Israel.

The second charge is “hardheartedness“, and I can’t plead innocence here either. Once I had nothing but a heart of stone, and although through grace I now have a new heart, much of my former obstinacy remains. I’m not moved by the death of Jesus as I ought to be. And I’m also not moved enough by the sin of my fellow human beings, the wickedness of our world, the attacks of doubters against my heavenly Father, and my own failures.

I wish I were rid of this ball and chain of hardheartedness within me, and I pray that my heart would melt at the recital of my Savior’s sufferings and death. This is why I must gladly proclaim “Blessed be the name of the Lord“, because this disease of the heart is not incurable. The Savior’s precious blood can render you clean, and even me it will effectually soften, until my heart is fully modest and entirely compassionate, like that of our Savior Himself.

Question: What is a favorite verse or passage of the Bible that gives you comfort when you feel the (very real) conviction of your own sin?

By Charles H Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2009

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daily devotional

Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation.” Joel 1:3

In this simple way, by God’s grace, a living testimony for truth is always kept alive in the world. The beloved of the Lord are to hand down their witness of the gospel and the covenant to their heirs. And these heirs will pass it along to their next descendants.

This is our first duty. We are to begin in our own family homes. A person who does not start his ministry at home is an inadequate witness. Now, all people who do not know Christ are to be sought by all means, and all the highways and hedges are to be searched. But home has a greater priority, and woe to those who reverse the order of the Lord’s appointments.

To teach our children is a personal duty. We cannot delegate it to Sunday school teachers, or other friendly aids. These can assist us, but cannot deliver us from the sacred obligation. Any substitutes are evil and insufficient. Mothers and fathers must, like Abraham, command their households in the fear of God, and talk with their offspring concerning the wondrous works of the Most High. Parental teaching is a natural duty. Who are more fit to look after a child’s well-being as those who are the authors of his actual being?

To neglect the instruction of our children is worse than wicked. Education in the faith is necessary for the world, for the family itself, and for the church of God. In a thousand ways insidious false teaching is covertly advancing in the world, and one of the most effective means for resisting it is almost always neglected, namely, the instruction of children in the faith.

I pray that parents would awaken to the importance of this matter. It is a pleasant duty to talk about Jesus with our sons and daughters, and all the more so because God has saved children through their parents’ prayers and patient instruction. May every house into which this devotional is read honor the Lord and receive His smile.

Questions: What makes it difficult to instruct children in the Christian faith? What nevertheless makes that effort so necessary and worthwhile?

Originally written by Charles H. Spurgeon.
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer

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devotional

For me to live is ChristPhilippians 1:21

A Christian did not always live for Christ. He or she began to do so when God the Holy Spirit convinced them of their sin, and when by grace he or she was brought to see the dying Savior substituting Himself in their place on the cross. Then, from the moment of our new and spiritual rebirth, we begin to live for Christ.

Jesus is to believers the one pearl of great price for whom we are willing to part with all that we have. He has so completely won our love that it beats alone for Him. To His glory we strive to live, and in defense of His gospel we would even die. He is the pattern of our life, and the model after which we aim to sculpt ourselves.

Paul’s words “For me to live is Christ” mean more than most people think. They imply that the aim and end of his life was Christ. His life itself attempted to embody Jesus. Jesus was his every breath, the soul of his soul, the heart of his heart, the life of his life.

Can you say, as a professing Christian, that you live up to this idea?

Can you honestly say that for you to live is Christ?

Consider your job: Are you doing it for Christ? Or is it done only for self-benefit and family advantage? If we profess to live for Christ, how can we live for another object without committing spiritual adultery?

While many carry out the principle of living for Christ halfheartedly, few would dare say that they live wholly for Christ as the apostle Paul did. Yet this alone is the true life of a Christian. This life’s source and nourishment are all gathered up in Christ Jesus.

Lord, accept me. I present myself, praying to live only in You and for You. Let my life be a ready sacrifice to you, and let my motto be, “For me to live is Christ.

By Charles H. Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

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devotional

Who will bring any charge against those whom God has chosen?” Romans 8:33

What a wonderful challenge! It’s wonderful because it’s totally unanswerable. Every sin of those whom God has chosen was laid upon Jesus, the great Champion of our salvation, and by His atonement carried away.

There is no sin in God’s book against His people. He sees no sin in Jacob, and no immorality in Israel, because they are wiped clean of their sin forever through in Christ. When the guilt of sin was taken away, the punishment for sin was also removed. For the Christian there will be no angry rebuke from God’s hand; no, not so much as a single frown of vengeful justice. The believer may be scolded by his Father, but God as Judge has nothing to say to the Christian, except ‘I have absolved you: you are acquitted.’

For the Christian there will be no ‘capital punishment’ from God in this world, much less any second death. A follower of Christ is completely freed from all punishment as well as the guilt and power of sin.

Sin may stand in our way, and frustrate us with its constant warfare, but sin is a conquered foe for every soul who walks with Jesus. A Christian can overcome any and every sin if they rely upon God to do it. Those who wear a white robe in heaven overcame through the blood of the Lamb, and we may do the same.

No lust is too mighty, no tempting sin too strongly entrenched. We can overcome it through the power of Christ. Your sin is a condemned thing. It may kick and struggle, but it is doomed to die. God has written condemnation across its brow and Christ has crucified it, ‘nailing it to His cross.’ Go now and renounce it, and the will Lord help you to live to His praise, for sin with all its guilt, shame, and fear, is gone.

Question: How do our sometimes valid feelings of guilt relate to our being made

By Charles H Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

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free devotionsAnd there was evening, and there was morning – the first day.” Genesis 1:5

Even in the beginning, did light and darkness divide the realm of time in the first day? From today’s scripture reading we can see that it did. Therefore it’s little wonder that we also have changes in our circumstances, wavering from the sunshine of prosperity to the midnight of adversity. My world will not always blaze brightly like the sun of noon. I must expect, at times, to mourn the absence of my former joys, and seek my Beloved God in the night.

I am not alone in this, for all the Lord’s beloved ones have had to sing the blended song of judgment and of mercy, of trial and deliverance, of sadness and of delight. It is God’s foresight that day and night will not disappear, either in the spiritual or natural creation, until we reach the land of which it is written, “there is no night there.” What our heavenly Father prepares for us is wise and good.

What, my friend, is it best for you to do? First learn to be content with God’s providence, and be willing, with Job, to receive from the hand of the Lord as He choose, both in the morning and the evening.

Next, study God’s Word and train yourself to make both the morning and the evening opportunities to rejoice. Praise the Lord for the sun of joy when it rises, and for the gloom of evening as it falls, because there is beauty both in sunrise and sunset. Sing of it like the nightingale, and glorify the Lord at all hours. Believe that the night is as useful as the day.

The dews of grace fall heavily in the night of sorrow. The stars of promise shine gloriously amid the darkness of grief. Continue your service in all situations. If in the day you work, at night instead work at quiet contemplation and meditation on God’s Word. Every hour has its purpose, so continue in your calling as the Lord’s servant until He suddenly appears in His glory.

My friend, even if your evening of old age and death is drawing near, do not dread it in the least, for it is part of the day, and the Lord has promised to protect and love you all the day long.

Question: Are you going through an “evening” right now? Where will you turn for support and comfort?

By Charles H. Spurgeon
Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2014/10/11/cs_perseverance-in-the-evening/


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Thoughts by All thoughts by Charles Spurgeon

by Charles H. Spurgeon

Tree branchesCatch for us the foxes, the little foxes that ruin the vineyards, our vineyards that are in bloom.”  Song of Solomon 2:15

A little thorn may cause much suffering. A little cloud may hide the sun. Little foxes spoil the vines; and little sins do mischief to the tender heart. These little sins burrow in the soul, and make it so full of that which is hateful to Christ, that He will hold no comfortable fellowship and communion with us. A great sin cannot destroy a Christian, but a little sin can make him or her miserable. Jesus will not walk with His people unless they turn away from every known sin. He says, “If you obey my commands, you will remain in my love, just as I have obeyed my Father’s commands and remain in his love.” (John 15:10)

Some Christians very seldom enjoy their Savior’s presence. How can this be? Surely it must be deeply hurtful for a tender child to be separated from their father. Aren’t you a child of God, and yet satisfied to go on without seeing your Father’s face? Aren’t you the spouse of Christ, and yet you’re content without His company? If so, you’ve fallen into a sad state, for when He has left her the pure spouse of Christ mourns like a dove without her mate.

Ask the question, what has driven Christ from you? He hides His face behind the wall of your sins. That wall may be built up of little pebbles as easily as it may be built up of great stones. The sea is made of drops; the rocks are made of grains: and the sea which divides you from Christ may be filled with the drops of your little sins; and the rock which has nearly wrecked your boat, may have been made by the daily working of the coral insects of your little sins. If you want to live with Christ, and walk with Christ, and see Christ, and have fellowship with Christ, take heed of “the little foxes that ruin the vineyards.” Jesus invites you to go with Him and take them. Jesus will surely be with you and help you eliminate foxes by His mighty power. Go with Him to the hunting!

You can comment on this devotional online at:
https://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/2013/12/03/cs_little-sins/

Updated to modern English by Darren Hewer, 2008.

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