Press "Enter" to skip to content
Home » Thoughts by Men » thoughts by Charles Stanley

Category: thoughts by Charles Stanley

Overcoming Failure

Share

Please open your Bible and read: Romans 7:15 – 20.

Victory is God’s will for the believer’s life. But sometimes we can find ourselves falling repeatedly into the same sin. As a result, our prayer life is marked by broken promises to end wrongdoing. We tell the Lord that we yearn to do what is right, but often our desire wanes when virtue is no longer convenient, pleasurable, or profitable. Many believers become angry with God for withholding victory, but sin is always our choice, not the Lord’s.

If a stinging conscience and misery are the result of our decision to sin, why do we continue in wrongdoing? One reason is incomplete repentance. It is possible for us to experience grief, embarrassment, and shame over sin without being truly repentant. The reason is that penitence isn’t a matter of weeping or feeling guilty; rather, true repentance is a change of mind about sin so that we agree with God’s viewpoint. Then the heart turns in a new direction, opposite from persistent wrongdoing.

The second reason for failure is an inadequate view of our true identity in the Lord. The believer, as a complete child of God, has Christ living within to empower him. When we grasp this truth, we will recognize that sin does not fit who we are and will stop rationalizing our offenses. Our genuine repentance is based upon an honest understanding of our identity.

When we put these two truths together, a powerful tool against Satan and temptation is created. Our Father wants us to be victorious, and we triumph over failure when we remember that Jesus Christ is our life.

by Dr. Charles Stanley

Used by permission
http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to  http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/charles-stanley_overcoming-failure/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Subscribe to Daily Devotionals by Email

Share

Victory over Unforgiveness

Share

Read: Daniel 6

Immediately after teaching His followers to pray, Jesus gave a warning about allowing unforgiveness to reside in the heart. He said that those who refuse to forgive others won’t be forgiven by the Father.

Do not misunderstand Jesus’ meaning here. Believers don’t lose their salvation when they refuse to forgive. Rather, they break fellowship with God because their unrepentant attitude gets in the way of regular confession and repentance. The Lord cannot ignore sin, and His Spirit will bring wrong behavior to the believer’s attention until he or she deals with it.

Forgiveness is an act of the will more than an act of the heart. Often people don’t feel like being merciful to someone who has wronged them. But a resentful spirit grows into a terrible burden. The Lord knows that forgiveness is best, even when it is difficult.

You won’t deal with a sin until you see it as God does. So assume full responsibility for your unforgiving attitude, and acknowledge that it is a violation of His Word. Claim the divine mercy He offers, and ask Him to enable you to lay aside anger and resentment against the other person(s). As part of the decision to move forward in grace, make a habit of praying for those who hurt you. And if God so leads, seek their forgiveness for your wrong attitude.

A bitter and resentful spirit doesn’t fit who we are in Christ. Nor is it healthy to carry an angry attitude through life. That’s why Scripture emphasizes the need to forgive. Choose to be liberated from your burden–Jesus promised to make us free when we release our sins to Him (John 8:36).

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by permission http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to  http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/charles-stanley_victory-over-unforgiveness/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Subscribe to Daily Devotionals by Email

Share

Overcoming the Barrier of Inadequacy

Share

Read: 2 Corinthians 2:14-17

No one likes feelings of inadequacy, but they are something we must learn to handle, as none of us can avoid them permanently. Tragically, though, many people live with a cloud over their head because in their thinking, they never measure up. For some, this may be due to childhood experiences that negatively affected their self-image. For others, the problem stems from a lack of success related to work, relationships, marriage, parenting, or any number of things.

The area Paul deals with in today’s passage is our Christian life. He asks a question that points to a common insecurity: “Who is adequate for these things?” (v. 16). Have you ever avoided serving the Lord in ways that challenge your comfort zone? If so, you’ve probably missed a tremendous opportunity to overcome feelings of inadequacy. He’s promised to lead us “in triumph in Christ,” (v. 14) but unless we believe Him and step out in faith, we’ll never experience the life He has planned for us.

Feeling inadequate is not a sin, but using it as an excuse is. When the Lord challenges you to do something that you feel is beyond your abilities, you have two options. You can focus on Christ and proceed in triumph or focus on yourself and withdraw in defeat.

It’s really a matter of faith. God would never ask you to do something without empowering you to accomplish it. This doesn’t necessarily mean you will do it perfectly, but each step of obedience is a victory. The alternative is to play it safe, but then you’ll miss out on God’s best for your life.

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/charles-stanley-overcoming-barrier-inadequacy/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

The Empowering Emotion of Joy

Share

Read: John 15:9-11

Is your life exciting? Or do you, like so many people, find most days routine and tedious? Have dreams become disappointments? If so, you might feel tempted to give up hope. But God promises fulfillment that can’t be found anywhere else.

Joy is a gift from the Lord. It doesn’t depend upon circumstances but rather is found in Jesus’ unchanging character and promises. And that’s exactly where to find true strength and power to endure.

Years ago I found myself being tested on this very point while working on a sermon about joy. A few days earlier, I had baptized a large number of people, and evidently, the repetitive motion had strained my back. There was no pain until midweek, when I tried to lift something heavy. Suddenly, I was dealing with severe backache. Almost immediately, the Lord brought to mind the message I was planning to present a few days later. Even though I complained and desperately wanted to be freed from the pain, I found I could be joyful in the Lord.

Philippians 4:4 tells us always to rejoice in Him. From this command, we know that even in the midst of hardship, we can purposefully choose to live with joy. This choice is possible for believers who are filled with the Holy Spirit and walking obediently (Galatians 5:22-23).

Consider your response to both good and bad times. Does a consistent joy in Christ give you strength? Or do you find emotional relief only in the midst of positive circumstances? Difficulty is inevitable, but God’s truth is able to sustain you. Rely on Him for emotional security.

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission  http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/charles-stanley_empowering-emotion-joy/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

Choosing Love over Rights

Share

Read: Matthew 5:38-48

We talk a lot about rights these days. Yet the attention given to human entitlements hasn’t brought about corporate or personal freedom. Instead, most people are prisoners of jealousy (you have greater rights than I do!), greed (I deserve more!), or bitterness (my rights have been violated!).

Instead of focusing on the privileges due us, we should take the biblical perspective of loving enemies and forgiving persecutors (Matthew 5:44). Believers lay down their rights so they can take up the cause of a holy kingdom. That doesn’t mean that we let people trample on us. Rather, we offer a proper response according to biblical principles. In short, believers should be more concerned about showing God’s love to those who do wrong than about demanding their rights.

Maybe you’re thinking, But he doesn’t know how I’ve been mistreated. Indeed I do not. But what I do know is how Jesus Christ, our example, reacted to terrible abuse. He was betrayed by His friends, persecuted by His people, condemned by His peers, and crucified for our sins. Yet He said, “Father, forgive them” (Luke 23:34).

Before assuming that Jesus’ capacity for forgiveness and love is out of reach for mere human beings, remember: His Spirit dwells in believers. We can choose to give away our rights and let God’s love work through us.

Luke 6:29 says to turn the other cheek and give up more than is asked because expressing love outweighs exerting our rights. You can’t lose when you show others the boundless care of the Lord. You gain His blessing, and, hopefully, someone will be saved because of your example.

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by permission
http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/charles-stanley_choosing-love-over-rights/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

The Path of Life

Share

I know, O LORD, that a man’s way is not in himself, Nor is it in a man who walks to direct his steps. Correct me, O LORD, but with justice; Not with Your anger, or You will bring me to nothing.Jeremiah 10:23-24

Life is like an untraveled trail with complex twists and turns. Appealing activities can be detours that lead to the quicksand of sin. And engaging philosophies may form side paths that end up in a mire of muddled thinking. Even the best route isn’t all sun-dappled meadows and quiet riverside lanes. We may at times have to journey over hard terrain or shadowed valleys. The only way to be sure we’re walking right is to follow one who knows the way perfectly.

God is the perfect, full-service Guide. No one can go wrong by keeping to the pathways He selects. Consider that He lovingly and intentionally created you for this time and this place. The Lord watches over your steps because He desires to see your purpose fulfilled and His plan come to fruition through you (Proverbs 3:5-6). Therefore, He promises to counsel those who follow Him (Psalm 25:12). When God warns His children away from a tempting sidetrack, it is because He foresees the dangers that lurk on that road.

There’s a correlation between ignoring God’s guidance and ending up in trouble: the one who stumbles off course has trusted his own “sense of direction”—his emotions, desires, or personal version of morality. He’s been pursuing what feels good or looks right instead of seeking the Lord’s will.

God has mapped out the path before you. He is aware of every obstacle and miry pit, and He knows exactly which sidetracks will tempt you. What’s more, He has committed to walk beside you as a Guide and Comforter so that you never face the twists and turns of this life alone.

by Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/charles-stanley_path-life/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

Finding Satisfaction

Share

Read: Philippians 4:11-13


God has provided us with many things to enjoy. But too often our lives are filled with turmoil instead of contentment. Four practices that create dissatisfaction are . . .

Busyness. We live in a hurry-up society, dashing from one activity to another. Jesus did not rush anywhere, yet He accomplished whatever God gave Him to do. Not once did He tell His followers to move faster. He even praised Mary for choosing to stop her work and spend time with Him (Luke 10:39, 42).

Earthly perspective. Too often we live focused on our circumstances. Our minds think about what happened earlier in the week, what’s on today’s agenda, and the activities occurring next week, month, or year. No wonder enjoyment of life remains elusive. The solution is to have an eternal perspective, which acknowledges that God is in charge and our goal is to please Him.

Self-imposed pressure. We have all experienced the unavoidable burdens of schoolwork, employment, and relationships. But we bring needless pressure on ourselves when we allow unnecessary “musts” and “shoulds” to rule us. The remedy is to turn to God, acknowledge His right to order our days, and ask for His plan.

Unhealthy attitudes. Perfectionism, false guilt, and apathy all undermine our enjoyment of life.

Satisfaction is found in a life that reflects God’s priorities—and time with Him comes first. Reading His Word, we become mindful of the Father’s great love, learn what He views as important, and experience the joy of belonging to Him. When contentment is elusive, it’s time to examine our priorities.

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

http://www.intouch.org/

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_satisfaction/


Share

The Uniqueness of Christ

Share

Read: Matthew 16:1-28

When Jesus asked His disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” they replied, “Some say John the Baptist; and others, Elijah; but still others, Jeremiah, or one of the prophets.” But Peter answered,You are the Christ, the Son of the living God
(Matthew 16:13-16).

What set Jesus apart as the Messiah?

  •  His birth: He was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born, as prophesied, in Bethlehem to a virgin. Though angels announced His arrival and He reigns over all creation, Jesus entered our world in a lowly manner so He could be identified with the meek and the poor.
  •  His wisdom: At age 12, He spent three days with rabbis, asking questions that showed his uncommon understanding.
  •  His baptism: Though He didn’t need cleansing, Jesus asked John to baptize Him so He could identify with sinners and demonstrate His love to them.
  •  His temptation: Satan tempted Him relentlessly for 40 days, yet He did not sin.
  • His ministry: He challenged man-made religious traditions. And by healing people—regardless of nationality—raising the dead, and forgiving sins, He revealed that God wants to be involved personally in our lives. Leading Pharisees wanted Him dead, but the Father protected His life until the crucifixion.

Many people deny Christ’s deity, calling Him simply a “prophet” or “good teacher.” But Jesus was never merely human. As complex as it is for us to comprehend, He was fully God and fully man. This is the unique way in which our heavenly Father chose to demonstrate His eternal love for us.

by Dr. Charles Stanley

Used by permission http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

Comments: If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_uniqueness/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

His Sufficient Grace

Share

2 Corinthians 12:7-10

thought the Christian life was going to be easier than this. Have these words ever entered your mind? Sometimes we come into the family of God thinking that our heavenly Father will fix all our problems and devote Himself to our happiness and comfort. However, that is not the reality portrayed in Scripture. Paul was a man whom the Lord used greatly, and yet his life was anything but easy.

In fact, at one point, the apostle thought his pain was too much to bear, and he begged God to remove it. There’s nothing wrong with asking the Lord to relieve our suffering, but what should our response be if He doesn’t? Paul probably had no idea that His experience would find its way into the Bible, to comfort and guide believers throughout the ages. The promise God gave him applies to us as well: “My grace is sufficient for you” (v. 9).

God’s grace could be defined as His provision for us at the point of our need. The problem is that sometimes it doesn’t seem as if the Lord truly is meeting our need. But He frequently sees deficiencies, outcomes, and complications that we don’t. His goals for us involve spiritual growth, the development of Christlike character, and strong faith. And trials play a vital role in achieving these.

The important issue is how we respond. If all you want is relief, you could descend into anger and doubt. But if your desire is to become the person God wants you to be, you’ll see each trial as an opportunity for Christ to display His character and strength in you.

 

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by permission http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

We’d love to hear from you.  If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_sufficient-grace/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

How to Hold On

Share

Read: Psalms 37:5-7

Job was a man who certainly knew trouble and temptation, and yet he boldly claimed, “Though He slay me, I will hope in Him(Job 13:15). That is commitment. Job had lost his children, his fortune, and his health, but he refused to abandon faith in God. The stricken man was determined to hold on because he trusted the Lord to do right.

Unwavering commitment to trust the Lord in all situations is a cornerstone of unshakable faith. From the vantage point of that foundation, we can focus our eyes upon God alone. It is easy to be distracted by circumstances and allow them to dictate our emotions. But if that’s the case, then when life is good, we’re happy; when times are tough, we’re frustrated; and when hardship pours in, we’re downright miserable and looking for escape.

Unlike Job, we are fortunate to have Scripture, which reveals God’s nature and promises. And it is a wise believer who claims those promises when enduring hardship. For His Word tells us that our Father is always good, always just, always faithful, and always trustworthy. When we take our eyes off the whirl of day-to-day activity and concentrate on honoring Him and following in His way, we find a consistent peace that carries us through both plenty and poverty.

In order to hold on to God through any trial or temptation, commit to trust and follow Him all of your days. Lay claim to His promises: The unchanging Lord and Savior (Hebrews 13:8) is committed to caring for you in all circumstances
(1 Peter 5:7) and will never leave or forsake you (Hebrews 13:5)

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

We’d love to hear from you.  If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_hold-on/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

Building Muscles of Faith

Share

Read: 1 Kings 18:22-36

I wish I had great faith.” These are words that almost every Christian has said at one time or another. But faith is like a muscle, which must be exercised in order to become strong; just wishing cannot make it happen.

Christians are to believe God, not only for salvation but for everything. Rather than a spiritual “plateau,” faith is actually a process that involves increasing degrees of trust throughout life. Little faith hopes that God will do what He says; strong faith knows that He will; and great faith believes that He has already done it.

Elijah was a man of great faith. He saw increased challenges as opportunities for God to do His work–and the prophet believed Him for the supernatural. So can you. The Lord may not do every miraculous thing you ask of Him, but He does some extraordinary work in and through each person who is obedient and willing to trust in Him.

You may be thinking, I am not good enough for the Father to use me. The Scriptures are filled with examples of weak and flawed people whom the Lord used to achieve His purposes. He is looking, not for perfection, but for individuals willing to believe Him. He not only works through people of faith; He transforms them.

Start by reading God’s Word to learn what He wants you to do. Each day’s situations and needs are opportunities to trust Him. Ask the Lord to bring to mind verses that apply to your circumstances. Trust Him and do what He says–your faith “muscles” will grow, and He will be glorified.

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

We’d love to hear from you.  If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_muscles/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

A Call to Godly Living

Share

The apostle Paul lived in an age when sensuality, the pursuit of pleasure, and rebellion against the Lord were prevalent. In response, he wrote letters urging Christians not to follow in the ways of the world. Like those early believers, we are to pursue godliness by…

1.    Presenting our bodies to God. Our total being–mind, will, emotions, personality, and physical body–are to be turned over to our heavenly Father
(James 4:7a). Submitting ourselves to the Lord requires a definite decision to give Him control and a daily commitment to remain under His authority. By surrendering to Him, we will position ourselves for godly living.

2.    Becoming living sacrifices. The Christian life is built around the concept of sacrifice. Jesus left the perfection of heaven to dwell among a sinful people so He might reconcile us to God. He offered up His life to make payment for our sins
(1 John 3:16) and brought us into His family. As believers, we are to follow His example. Paul called it a living sacrifice, because it is ongoing–one that is repeated daily.

Life is full of options. Many decisions involve a choice between following God’s way or our own. Maturing Christians will increasingly sacrifice their own desires and embrace His will.

A life of godliness is characterized by a heart and mind bent toward the things of God. Although we will live imperfectly, our focus is to be on obeying His will and pleasing Him. Let’s commit to becoming more like Jesus, the One who willingly gave Himself to God as a sacrifice for us

by Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

We’d love to hear from you.  If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_godly-living/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/

Share

Developing a Tender Heart

Share

Read: Ezekiel 36:25-28

The Lord wants to give each of us a “heart of flesh” so that we will be pliable and responsive to Him. When touched by the finger of God, a tender heart yields to the pressure and assumes the form He desires, much like a lump of clay that allows the potter to determine the shape of the vessel.

To aid in this process, God has sent the Holy Spirit to indwell each believer and awaken responsiveness in him or her. By yielding to the Spirit’s promptings with ready obedience, the heart becomes increasingly tender and sensitive to His leading. The Lord is able to impart greater understanding of His Word to a soft heart because it has faithfully accepted and obeyed previous teachings.

Any resistance to God will result in hardening. But those who are accustomed to intimacy with Christ–which is the result of submission to Him–will be quick to deal with sin and return to the place of obedience and blessing.

People with tender hearts stay closely connected to the body of Christ, seeking to build up and encourage others in their walk of faith. Such individuals are not only receptive to what God wants to tell them; they are also teachable, in that they are willing to listen and be corrected by others.

This week when you read your Bible and pray, let your heart be soft toward the words of God. As He pokes His finger into each hard area, listen to His instructions, and rely on the Spirit’s power to help you yield and obey. Let Him shape you into a beautiful and useful vessel.

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission
http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

We’d love to hear from you.  If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_tender-heart/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/

Share

The Source of Our Adversity

Share

Read Isaiah 45:5-10

When we experience hardships, we usually wonder why God allows these painful situations to come our way. It just doesn’t seem to fit with His role as our loving heavenly Father. We struggle to reconcile our suffering with His love for us and His power to prevent or stop it. In order to understand what’s going on, we need to consider the possible sources of adversity.

A Fallen World: When sin entered the world, suffering came with it. God could have protected us from these harmful effects by making us like puppets who could not choose sin, but that would mean we’d also be unable to choose to love Him, because love must be voluntary.

Our Own Doing: Sometimes we get ourselves into trouble with our foolish or sinful choices. If the Lord stepped in and rescued us from every negative consequence, we’d never grow into mature believers.

Satanic Attack: The Devil is our enemy. To hinder anything the Lord wants to do in and through believers, Satan will never cease to harass us. His goal is to destroy our lives and our testimonies, thereby making us weak and useless for God’s purposes.

God’s Sovereignty: Ultimately, the Lord is in charge of all adversity that comes our way. To deny His involvement contradicts His power and sovereignty over creation.

For us to accept that God allows–or even sends–afflictions, we must see adversity from His perspective. Is your focus on the pain of your experience or on the Lord and His faithfulness? As believers, we’re assured that no adversity comes our way unless He can use it to achieve His good purposes.

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

We’d love to hear from you.  If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_adversity/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Share

Practical Ways to Bear Burdens

Share

praying hands

Now we exhort you, brethren, warn those who are unruly, comfort the fainthearted, uphold the weak, be patient with all.”  1 Thessalonians 5:14

There are hurting people everywhere, but at times we just don’t know what to say or do to ease their pain. Here are six practical ways to bear someone else’s burden.

1. Be there. At times the best “method” of helping is simply to be present. During our darkest hours, we don’t need someone who tries in vain to fix everything; we just need a friend.

2. Listen. Don’t attempt to give answers or tell people what to do next. Injured souls frequently want simply a listening ear so they can express what’s on their mind.

3. Share. Never parade yourself as someone who has all the answers. Instead, allow your own pain and failures to help others.

4. Pray. There is power in speaking people’s names before the Lord. When they hear someone talk to Jesus on their behalf, healing often starts taking place.

5. Give. Sometimes helping others involves more than a handshake or warm hug. Maybe they need something financial or material. One of the best measures of sincerity is how much we’re willing to give to others.

6. Substitute. You may know an individual who bears the burden of caring for someone else. If you step in and take his or her place for a while, you are emulating your Savior–He, too, was a substitute.

Because we were unable to do it ourselves, Jesus bore all of our sin and sorrow, even unto death. As a result, we can live happily and eternally in communion with our Father. If Christ did that for us, how can we ever say, “I’m too busy to bear someone else’s burden“?

By Dr. Charles Stanley
Used by Permission  http://www.intouch.org/

WE WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Enter Email

We’d love to hear from you.  If you don’t see our response form, please go to http://thoughts-about-god.com/blog/cs_practical/

Learn more about knowing Jesus at: http://thoughts-about-god.com/four-laws/


Follow us by:
       
 Follow  Follow

Share